what do we mean by MIS (or MICS)


Most patients who are candidates for this type of surgery can now count on safe and efficient operations; however, an evaluation of the preoperative profile is essential to better plan the intervention and assess its technical feasibility.

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What are the main approaches to minimally invasive heart surgery?

Depending on the type of intervention, the intervention can be performed by a straight mini-thoracotomy of about 5 cm, for access to the mitral and / or tricuspid valve, and any pathology relating to the atrial cavities (interatrial defects, foramen permeable oval, etc.) or a left mini-thoracotomy for pathology of the left ventricle (coronary artery disease, implantation of stimulation electrodes, etc.).

Pathologies affecting the aortic valve and / or the ascending aorta can be addressed by a mini-sternotomy, which limits the opening of the sternum to about half of its length, preserving the stability of the unaffected part, or by a mini – Right anterior thoracotomy.

In all cases of minimally invasive surgery, it may be appropriate to isolate the femoral vessels through a small inguinal incision of approximately 3 cm to establish cardiopulmonary bypass.

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What are the benefits of minimally invasive heart surgery?

In general, the minimally invasive approach guarantees the same quality and the same safety as a traditional approach, while reducing surgical trauma, pain and possible complications related to the operation, with particular attention to recovery. faster functioning and a better aesthetic result.

The practice of these approaches, which has lasted for more than twenty years in our Center, allows us to guarantee optimal long-term results, comparable to those of traditional surgery.

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Is the minimally invasive approach painful or dangerous?

In general, surgery can be associated with various complications such as bleeding, infection, neurological damage, heart failure, and perioperative infarction.

Other less serious complications include inflammation and pleural effusion, atrial fibrillation, pain, lack of appetite, and fever.

Normally, the risk of death associated with this procedure is less than 3%, but a risk assessment is required for each patient, taking into account age, general condition and associated illnesses.

However, in selected patients, the minimally invasive approach has been shown to reduce the incidence of certain complications, leading to a more rapid return to normal functional activity.

Also read:

Surviving OHCA – The American Heart Association: Unarmed CPR Increases Survival Rate

Cardiac arrest outside hospital (OHCA): “Targeted hypothermia does not reduce the number of deaths in patients in a coma”

Cardiac arrest, the EENA document for voluntary rescuers and citizens

Source:

Humanitas


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