Nebraska Medicine rolls back ‘crisis care standards’ protocol

Nebraska Medicine will resume surgeries and other procedures on Monday, Feb. 7 that were delayed by the “Crisis Standards of Care” protocol, implemented Jan. 13. The hospital will no longer be in crisis mode, but Nebraska Medicine will maintain emergency operations — which allow spaces and clinical practices to be modified as needed. “We believe that at this time, given the trends we are seeing in the community and again, most importantly, the number of staff we have to care for patients that the time is right for us to open up and to create better access to care,” said COO Cory Shaw. The healthcare system made the decision to enter crisis mode due to a surge of omicron cases in the Omaha community. “Our leadership has made the difficult decision to activate this plan…because our community’s health care demand currently exceeds our available resources,” Kayla Thomas, media relations manager for Nebraska Medicine, said in a press release Jan. 13. At its peak in January, Nebraska Medicine was treating about 130 COVID-19 patients. That number fell to 100 on Friday. Shaw said the hospital remains on alert for another wave. “We have pockets where we have We still have challenges, but we are able to work around them,” Shaw said. “We are always going to be in emergency mode. And we are going to have to be vigilant about what is happening around us and the pandemic is always unpredictable.” The Crisis Standards of Care plan helps guide healthcare worker decisions when demand for resources exceeds availability. “From an operational perspective, what we have done with the staff will prevent us from going any further down the crisis continuum,” said Dr. Harris Frankel, medical director and chief compliance officer for Nebraska Medicine, at KETV on January 1. 21. Since the standards were promulgated on January 13, the hospital estimates that 15,000 appointments and 600 surgeries have been canceled, postponed or delayed. The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services also released a new directed health measure limiting surgeries at the Nebraska Medical Center. The directed health measure suspended pre-scheduled elective surgeries, including Class C, D, and E inpatient and outpatient procedures. Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts announced Friday that the directed health measure will expire Feb. 7 at 9 a.m. Shaw said Governor Ricketts. ‘ The directed health measure caused some outpatient clinics and surgery centers to close. fashion, COVID-19 cases have peaked in Douglas County and a record number of people have been hospitalized with the virus. However, as Douglas County Chief Health Officer Lindsay Huse told the Board of Commissioners on February 1, while we are still seeing high transmission of COVID-19, cases are going down – and they are going down. quite strongly. Huse also said hospitalizations appear to have stabilized as well, but many hospitals are still struggling with high capacity. going to continue to need to measure activity, no spaces to make sure we don’t end up with too much activity too quickly,” Shaw said.

Nebraska Medicine will resume surgeries and other procedures on Monday, Feb. 7 that were delayed by the “Crisis Standards of Care” protocol, implemented Jan. 13.

The hospital will no longer be in crisis mode, but Nebraska Medicine will maintain emergency operations — which allow spaces and clinical practices to be modified as needed.

“We believe right now, given the trends we are seeing in the community and again, most importantly, the number of staff we have to care for patients, that now is the time for us to open up and create better access to care,” said COO Cory Shaw.

The health system made the decision to go into crisis mode due to an increase in omicron cases in the Omaha community.

“Our leaders have made the difficult decision to activate this plan … because our community’s demand for health care currently exceeds our available resources,” Kayla Thomas, media relations manager for Nebraska Medicine, said in a statement. January 13 press.

At its peak in January, Nebraska Medicine was treating about 130 COVID-19 patients. That number fell to 100 on Friday. Shaw said the hospital remains on alert for another wave.

“We have pockets where we still have challenges, but we’re able to work around them,” Shaw said. “We are always going to be in emergency mode. And we are going to have to be vigilant about what is happening around us and the pandemic is always unpredictable.”

The crisis care standard plan helps guide healthcare worker decisions when demand for resources exceeds availability.

“From an operational point of view, what we have done with the staff will prevent us from going any further down the crisis continuum,” Dr. Harris Frankel, medical director and head of the Nebraska Medicine compliance.

Since the standards were enacted on January 13, the hospital estimates that 15,000 appointments and 600 surgeries have been canceled, postponed or delayed.

The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services also released a new directed health measure limiting surgeries at the Nebraska Medical Center.

The directed health measure suspended pre-scheduled elective surgeries, including class C, D and E inpatient and outpatient procedures.

Nebraska Governor Pete Ricketts announced Friday that the directed health measure will expire at 9 a.m. Feb. 7.

Shaw said the health measure led by Governor Ricketts has resulted in the closure of some outpatient clinics and surgery centers.

“We will begin to slowly reopen access to all of our outpatient sites, both primary care and specialty care and as part of scheduled procedures,” Shaw said.

While Nebraska Medicine was in crisis mode, COVID-19 cases peaked in Douglas County and record numbers of people were hospitalized with the virus.

However, as Douglas County Chief Health Officer Lindsay Huse told the Board of Commissioners on February 1, while we are still seeing high transmission of COVID-19, cases are going down – and they are going down. quite strongly.

Huse also said hospitalizations also appeared to have stabilized, but many hospitals were still struggling with high capacity.

Shaw said while COVID-19 cases are down and more staff are back at work, there are still some changes in place to keep services on track.

“We’re always going to continue to need to measure activity, not spaces to make sure we don’t end up with too much activity too quickly,” Shaw said.

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