Surgical procedures – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:15:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-08T154233.528.png Surgical procedures – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ 32 32 The patient profile in acute endophthalmitis referral has evolved over a decade https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-patient-profile-in-acute-endophthalmitis-referral-has-evolved-over-a-decade/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 14:05:28 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-patient-profile-in-acute-endophthalmitis-referral-has-evolved-over-a-decade/ New findings suggest that the profile of patients referred for acute endophthalmitis has evolved over the past decade. The data show a decrease in the raw number of cases of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery as opposed to an increase in the number of patients who experienced endophthalmitis after intravitreal injections. “The overall incidence of acute […]]]>

New findings suggest that the profile of patients referred for acute endophthalmitis has evolved over the past decade.

The data show a decrease in the raw number of cases of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery as opposed to an increase in the number of patients who experienced endophthalmitis after intravitreal injections.

“The overall incidence of acute endophthalmitis was 1 in 1920 procedures,” wrote study author Catherine Creuzot-Garcher, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital, Dijon, France.

Alongside his colleagues, Creuzot-Garcher endeavored to describe longitudinally, on a national scale, the causes of acute postoperative endophthalmitis. The cohort study took place from 2009 to 2018 in France.

The participants included were people diagnosed with acute endophthalmitis after intraocular procedures. Investigators collected patient information from the French medico-administrative database.

They identified cases of endophthalmitis and intraocular procedures based on billing codes in all French hospitals and private practices. The primary outcome of the study was the incidence of acute endophthalmitis within 42 days postoperatively.

From January 2009 to October 2018, a total of 7,522 cases of acute endophthalmitis occurred after 14,438,854 intraocular procedures. The majority of cases occurred after isolated cataract surgery (4,808 cases for 7,316,077 procedures; 63.92%), followed by intravitreal injections (1,296 cases for 5,455,631 intravitreal injections; 17.23% ).

Next come vitreoretinal surgery (698 for 442,263 procedures; 9.28%), anterior segment surgery (245 cases; 3.26%), combined cataract and vitreoretinal surgery (698 for 442,263 procedures; 9.28% ), surgery of the anterior segment (245 cases; 3.25%), combined cataract and vitreoretinal surgery (191 cases, 2.54%), corneal surgery (142 cases, 1.89%) and surgery of the glaucoma (80 cases, 1.06%).

Investigators found the overall incidence rate of acute endophthalmitis to be 0.0521% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.0520 – 0.0522). The surgery with the highest incidence of endophthalmitis was scleral and globe surgery, with an incidence of 0.1827% (95% CI, 0.1757, 0.1898).

The second highest incidence was vitreoretinal surgery combined with cataract surgery, with an incidence of 0.1685% (95% CI, 0.1663, 0.1706). The data show that the incidence of endophthalmitis after intravitreal injection was stable throughout the stable period, and those who received intravitreal injections were oldest at age 75.4 years (standard deviation, 12. 0 years; P <.001).

Additionally, the onset of endophthalmitis after intravitreal procedures, including vitreoretinal injection or surgery, was earlier than after other procedures (P <.001).

The study, “Epidemiology of Acute Endophthalmitis after Intraocular Procedures: A National Database Study,” was published in Ophthalmology.

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Ruling sends women back to back alley | Letters https://rhinoplastydigest.com/ruling-sends-women-back-to-back-alley-letters/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 19:42:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/ruling-sends-women-back-to-back-alley-letters/ It was 1963, before abortion was legal, and I was a medical student at Boston City Hospital and working in the emergency room. Night after night, women as young as 14 were brought to the emergency room following desperate attempts to terminate an unwanted pregnancy. They used everything from dirty catheters, metal coat hangers and […]]]>

It was 1963, before abortion was legal, and I was a medical student at Boston City Hospital and working in the emergency room.

Night after night, women as young as 14 were brought to the emergency room following desperate attempts to terminate an unwanted pregnancy. They used everything from dirty catheters, metal coat hangers and even inserted acid to try and terminate the pregnancy. These women had high fevers and died of terrible infections every day, despite our best efforts to save them with intravenous antibiotics and major surgeries, including hysterectomies. It was a horrific time for these patients and for the doctors and nurses trying to help them survive.

Since Roe v. Wade made abortion legal in 1973, I haven’t seen a single case of septic abortion in over 50 years of my OB-GYN practice in New Jersey.

I am overwhelmed with sadness and find it almost impossible to believe that the dark days of “behind the scenes” abortions could be upon us again in 2022.

Ron Zevin, MD, Short Hills

Note: The author is a retired OB-GYN physician.





A time lag in this country

What is happening in this country?

It’s incredible; it’s like stepping back in time.

First, of course, there was the January 6 insurgency sparked by a former president who did not want to leave office. Never before in the history of this great country has this happened.

Then the Supreme Court of the United States handed down a decision that essentially allows everyone to carry a gun.

It’s a bit like the colonial era. And, now, the court overturns the Roe v. Wade.

Why are we becoming a country again with less freedom and more murder?

The GOP clowns — not all Republicans — better start saving up to put all those unwanted kids through college.

Michele Bedford, Linden

The Unmentionable: Abortion and More

Our US Constitution apparently doesn’t mention abortion, so the US Supreme Court just struck down 50 years of protection for American women by striking down Roe v. Wade.

The framers of the Constitution did not mention cars, airplanes, computers, or microwave ovens. And, nowhere in our “original” Constitution is there any mention of electric hair dryers, laser printers, pinball machines, HDTVs, propane grills, or cloud computing.

Will the “originalist” members of the Supreme Court also get rid of all these wonderful things, simply because they are not mentioned in the Constitution? I do not know. But I believe these judges are then going to take away our right to privacy.

Frank L. Freet, West Milford

Double jeopardy in car insurance

Regarding the recent article, “NJ Auto Insurance Rates Could Skyrocket for 1 Million Drivers Under New Bills, Opponents Warn,” about legislation that would require minimum coverage of $250,000 Personal Injury Protection (PIP), down from $15,000 now:

If I have proof that my health insurance provider will cover my medical expenses if injured in a car accident, I shouldn’t be required to maintain PIP coverage, not even the current minimum of $15,000. Our lawmakers should focus on how to implement this change, instead of arbitrarily requiring all drivers to maintain a minimum of $250,000 PIP coverage.

The big winners from this auto insurance reform proposal are health insurance providers who would no longer have to pay the first $250,000 in medical bills for crash-related injuries, and every driver in the state will finance the exceptional profits of health insurers. .

Let’s hope our lawmakers and Governor Phil Murphy realize this before it’s too late.

Joseph Berkowitz, Berkeley Heights

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Jayadeva Hosp Doctors Install Heart Valve Without Surgery | Mysore News https://rhinoplastydigest.com/jayadeva-hosp-doctors-install-heart-valve-without-surgery-mysore-news/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 02:56:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/jayadeva-hosp-doctors-install-heart-valve-without-surgery-mysore-news/ Mysore: Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Science and ResearchMysuru unit, introduced advanced medical treatment in valve implantation for its patients and successfully implanted artificial valves without surgery in one day. Now, patients no longer need to travel to Bengaluru for the procedure. The procedure is expensive and Jayadeva The authorities have decided to only offer […]]]>

Mysore: Sri Jayadeva Institute of Cardiovascular Science and ResearchMysuru unit, introduced advanced medical treatment in valve implantation for its patients and successfully implanted artificial valves without surgery in one day.
Now, patients no longer need to travel to Bengaluru for the procedure. The procedure is expensive and Jayadeva The authorities have decided to only offer this procedure to patients who can afford it and those for whom the surgery is a bit difficult due to age and illness.
Medical Superintendent Dr. KS Sadananda told TOI that this is a state of the art facility available for Aortic Valve Replacement and is introduced in Jayadeva Hospital in Mysuru for the first time. The Jayadeva Hospital in Bengaluru has been offering this procedure for some time.
“We performed this advanced procedure – Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation (TAVI) in Mysuru on four patients in a single day and implanted valves. This is done without any surgery and the valve is implanted by inserting a catheter into the blood vessel. After this procedure, the patient is able to walk within a day unlike surgery which requires a minimum of two to four weeks of recovery. Even the time spent on each procedure is less than that of surgery,” he said.
“TAVI procedure costs around Rs 16 Lakh at Jayadeva Hospital while it is higher at private hospitals. Aortic valve replacement surgery would cost around Rs 2.5 lakh. We will recommend surgical procedures for fit patients and offer advanced facilities for those who are not.
Jayadeva performed the operation for free for one patient and for two others at a subsidized cost. The fourth patient had insurance coverage, said Doctor Sadananda.

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New Surgical Technique By Mgm Docs | Indore News https://rhinoplastydigest.com/new-surgical-technique-by-mgm-docs-indore-news/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 03:06:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/new-surgical-technique-by-mgm-docs-indore-news/ Indore: Local surgeons MGM Medical College have developed a laparoscopic technique that reduces the cost of the implant during lower abdominal hernia surgeries from Rs 20,000 to Rs 10.A nailer – metallic and biodegradable – used to secure mesh to tissue during laparoscopic surgery in inguinal hernia cases has been replaced with a cyanoacrylate compound. […]]]>

Indore: Local surgeons MGM Medical College have developed a laparoscopic technique that reduces the cost of the implant during lower abdominal hernia surgeries from Rs 20,000 to Rs 10.
A nailer – metallic and biodegradable – used to secure mesh to tissue during laparoscopic surgery in inguinal hernia cases has been replaced with a cyanoacrylate compound. The stapler costs Rs 18,000-20,000. The cyanoacrylate we use costs only Rs 10, MGM Medical Associate professor at college Dr Arvind Shukla Tell yourself.
Cyanoacrylates are a family of fast-acting adhesives with a variety of uses, including in the medical field. “This is the first time cyanoacrylate has been used in this way,” he said.
Shukla, who invented the technique about two years ago, said the reduction in the cost of surgery has been a boon for poor patients reaching the my hospital. “We have successfully performed 55 to 60 laparoscopic surgeries using cyanoacrylate over the past year,” he said.
Unlike using staples to secure the mesh after removing the hernia laparoscopically, the cyanoacrylate is pressed into place using syringes – a simple process that does not involve sutures.
“Cyanoacrylate is well accepted. Patients reported less pain, compared to staplers,” the associate professor said.
The technique has been accepted in the international forum. I
At a recent Korean Society of Endoscopic and Laparoscopic Surgeons (KSLES) International Symposium, a presentation on the technique by Dr. Shukla was deemed the best and selected in the global forum. TNN

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Expanding use of faster TAVI procedure for AS could eliminate cardiac surgery backlog – Critical Care https://rhinoplastydigest.com/expanding-use-of-faster-tavi-procedure-for-as-could-eliminate-cardiac-surgery-backlog-critical-care/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 01:25:36 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/expanding-use-of-faster-tavi-procedure-for-as-could-eliminate-cardiac-surgery-backlog-critical-care/ Image: Heart surgery backlog needs urgent action, new study finds (Photo courtesy of Pexels) Aortic stenosis (AS) develops when the aortic valve of the heart narrows, which restricts blood flow out of the heart. The traditional treatment for AS is to replace the narrowed valve, most commonly with open-heart surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). […]]]>

Image: Heart surgery backlog needs urgent action, new study finds (Photo courtesy of Pexels)

Aortic stenosis (AS) develops when the aortic valve of the heart narrows, which restricts blood flow out of the heart. The traditional treatment for AS is to replace the narrowed valve, most commonly with open-heart surgery (surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). But transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI), which is a new keyhole procedure, is being used more and more and is now recommended for patients aged 75 and over. Prompt treatment is vital for people diagnosed with severe AS, as around 50% will die within two years of the onset of symptoms. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused thousands of cardiac procedures to be postponed and waiting lists to be registered. Now, an international team of researchers has found that converting some of the procedures from SAVR to TAVI would help eliminate the heart surgery backlog.

Researchers from the University of Leeds (West Yorkshire, UK) have warned that inaction could lead to the deaths of thousands of people while waiting for treatment for AS and that urgent action is needed to clear the backlog people waiting for life-saving treatment. Previous work estimated that 4,989 people in the UK with severe AS missed life-saving treatment between March and November 2020. The researchers modeled the potential impact on waiting lists of increased treatment capacity as well than using the faster and less invasive treatment. TAVI procedure. Even in the best-case scenario, they found that the waiting list would take nearly a year to disappear and more than 700 people would die while waiting for treatment.

Researchers studied the impact that increasing processing capacity and converting some operations to the faster TAVI procedure would have on the backlog. They found that the best and most feasible option involved a combination of increasing capacity by 20% and converting 40% of procedures from SAVR to TAVI. This would clear the backlog in 343 days, with 784 deaths while people wait for treatment. The team wants to see greater collaboration at local and national levels to agree on needed changes that can ensure people with severe AS receive crucial treatment as quickly as possible.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been a sharp drop in procedures used to treat severe aortic stenosis. In our study, we found that without a combination of increased capacity to treat patients with severe AS and expanded use of TAVI, there would be many potentially preventable deaths during the post recovery period. -COVID-19,” said Professor Chris Gale, Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine at the Medical School and co-director of the Leeds Institute for Data Analytics. “It’s the only option that will prevent the deaths of thousands of people with untreated aortic stenosis.”

“Before the pandemic, around 13,500 SAVR and TAVI procedures were performed each year across the UK. Increasing capacity by 20% would mean one or two additional TAVI procedures each week per centre,” added Professor Mamas Mamas, Professor of Cardiology at Keele University and Consultant Cardiologist at University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust, who was l one of the principal investigators of the study. .

Related links:
University of Leeds

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Korean Surgeons Explain Latest Spine Surgery Methods – Pakistan https://rhinoplastydigest.com/korean-surgeons-explain-latest-spine-surgery-methods-pakistan/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 02:42:31 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/korean-surgeons-explain-latest-spine-surgery-methods-pakistan/ LAHORE: A five-member team of Korean orthopedic surgeons shared their experiences with Pakistani doctors on modern methods of spinal surgery treatment here at Lahore General Hospital (LGH). The operations of patients undergoing spinal treatment were performed. This effort aimed to provide the latest surgical techniques and procedures by surgeons in addition to benefiting from the […]]]>

LAHORE: A five-member team of Korean orthopedic surgeons shared their experiences with Pakistani doctors on modern methods of spinal surgery treatment here at Lahore General Hospital (LGH).

The operations of patients undergoing spinal treatment were performed. This effort aimed to provide the latest surgical techniques and procedures by surgeons in addition to benefiting from the latest trends so that young doctors can adopt this advanced technology in their daily treatment of spine patients.

Addressing the participants, Senior Professor of Postgraduate Medical Institute and Ameer Uddin Medical College, Dr. Muhammad Al-freed Zafar said that Korea’s internationally renowned medical specialists and experts gave the young consultants the opportunity to learn about different new innovations that are useful. in their future professional life.

LGH Professor of Orthopedics, Mian Muhammad Hanif, said the course was organized by Pakistan Association of Spine Surgeons and in collaboration with Korea Medical University, at which five doctors led by Prof. Seung Woo Suh from Korean University participated.

Speaking to the media, Prof. Al-freed Zafar hoped that this workshop would enhance the knowledge and skills of local doctors, which would directly benefit spine surgery patients and doctors.

Copyright Business Recorder, 2022

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Urgent action needed to clear heart surgery backlog, research finds https://rhinoplastydigest.com/urgent-action-needed-to-clear-heart-surgery-backlog-research-finds/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 16:31:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/urgent-action-needed-to-clear-heart-surgery-backlog-research-finds/ Urgent action is needed to clear the backlog of people with common heart disease who are waiting for lifesaving treatment, according to research co-led by Professor Keele. Researchers have warned that a lack of action could lead to the death of thousands of people while waiting for treatment, with the Covid-19 pandemic leading to the […]]]>

Urgent action is needed to clear the backlog of people with common heart disease who are waiting for lifesaving treatment, according to research co-led by Professor Keele.

Researchers have warned that a lack of action could lead to the death of thousands of people while waiting for treatment, with the Covid-19 pandemic leading to the postponement of thousands of heart procedures and record waiting lists. Previous work estimated that 4,989 people in England with severe aortic stenosis missed life-saving treatment between March and November 2020.

The study, supported by the British Heart Foundation, was published today in BMJ Open.

Aortic stenosis develops when the aortic valve of the heart narrows, which restricts blood flow out of the heart. Prompt treatment is vital for people diagnosed with severe aortic stenosis, as around 50% will die within two years of the onset of symptoms.

Today, an international team of researchers modeled the impact that increasing treatment capacity and using a faster, less invasive treatment option would have on waiting lists. Even in the best-case scenario, they found that the waiting list would take nearly a year to disappear, and more than 700 people would die while waiting for treatment.

The traditional treatment for aortic stenosis is to replace the narrowed valve, most often with open-heart surgery (a surgical aortic valve replacement, SAVR). However, a new keyhole procedure called transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is gaining popularity and is now recommended for patients aged 75 and over.

Researchers studied the impact that increasing processing capacity and converting some operations to the faster TAVI procedure would have on the backlog. They looked at how long it would take to clear the backlog and how many people would die while waiting for treatment.

They found that the best and most feasible option involved a combination of increasing capacity by 20% and converting 40% of procedures from SAVR to TAVI. This would clear the backlog in 343 days with 784 deaths while people wait for treatment.

The team says they want to see greater collaboration locally and nationally to agree on needed changes that can ensure people with severe aortic stenosis receive life-saving treatment as quickly as possible.

Professor Mamas Mamas, Professor of Cardiology at Keele University and Consultant Cardiologist at North Midlands NHS Trust University Hospitals, was one of the lead researchers in the study.

He said: “Before the pandemic, around 13,500 SAVR and TAVI procedures were carried out each year across the UK. Increasing capacity by 20% would mean one or two additional TAVI procedures each week per centre. We believe that with local and national collaboration, this increase In addition, we have created an algorithm that NHS Trusts can use to determine the best approach locally.

“Since November 2020 the UK has been hit by new waves of Covid-19 which have resulted in extreme pressure on the NHS and further delays in treatment. We expect the number of people waiting for treatment in recent months is even higher than the figure we used in our study.

“Doing nothing is simply not an option. If we continue as we are now, thousands of people will die from untreated aortic stenosis.”

Dr Sonya Babu-Narayan, Associate Medical Director at the British Heart Foundation and Consultant Cardiologist, added: “We welcome the use of innovative cardiovascular procedures which can reduce the need for open heart surgery where appropriate and where their use will bring the greatest benefit to patients.

“But, as this modeling study shows, even increased use of this faster, less invasive procedure will not be enough to overcome the impact of Covid-19-related delays and prevent people with aortic stenosis from dying in the first place. waiting for treatment.

“Cardiac care cannot wait. The NHS desperately needs additional resources to help it deal with the backlog of care and to ensure that cardiac patients receive the treatment and care they need.”

This research was partly funded by the EPSRC Cambridge Center for Mathematics of Information in Healthcare.

Source:

Journal reference:

Stickies, CP, et al. (2022) Post-COVID-19 aortic stenosis: a mathematical model on waiting lists and mortality. BMJ open. doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2021-059309.

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Intraoperative catheter disappoints for urinary retention after hernia repair https://rhinoplastydigest.com/intraoperative-catheter-disappoints-for-urinary-retention-after-hernia-repair/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 17:30:25 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/intraoperative-catheter-disappoints-for-urinary-retention-after-hernia-repair/ Intraoperative catheter use did not protect against the development of postoperative urinary retention (PUR) in patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair surgery, according to a randomized trial. Among more than 450 of these patients, no significant difference was observed in the rate of PUR for those who received intraoperative catheter placement compared to those […]]]>

Intraoperative catheter use did not protect against the development of postoperative urinary retention (PUR) in patients who underwent laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair surgery, according to a randomized trial.

Among more than 450 of these patients, no significant difference was observed in the rate of PUR for those who received intraoperative catheter placement compared to those who did not (9.6% versus 8. 5%, respectively, P=0.79), reported Aldo Fafaj, MD, of the Cleveland Clinic Center for Abdominal Core Health in Ohio, and colleagues.

“The lack of apparent immediate clinical benefit accompanied by the potential for rare but devastating complications offers a compelling argument for abandoning the routine use of catheters during laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in patients who urinate before the procedure. operation,” the band wrote in JAMA Surgery.

During laparoscopic inguinal repair surgery, urinary catheters are often placed to protect against PUR and bladder damage, Fafaj’s group noted. PUR is the most common complication of the procedure, with an incidence of up to 22%.

However, the required use of intraoperative catheters can also lead to catheter-related infections, prostatitis, and complications of urethral trauma, aside from patient discomfort alone. PUR was previously linked to higher healthcare costs, urinary tract infections, longer hospital stays and lower patient satisfaction.

“Low-value services are ubiquitous in healthcare,” noted Martin Almquist, MD, PhD, of Skåne University Hospital in Malmö, Sweden, in an accompanying editorial. “The United States alone is estimated to spend more than $100 billion a year on unnecessary medical tests, treatments, and procedures that expose patients to harm with no apparent benefit. Deimplementation has proven difficult, despite campaigns such as Choosing Wisely Canada.

He noted that “although no evidence of effect does not equal evidence of no effect”, the current study “provides a strong argument for abandoning routine urinary catheter placement during repair. elective endoscopic examination of an inguinal hernia”.

For their study, Fafaj and colleagues recruited 491 patients with primary or recurrent inguinal hernias and randomized them to receive an intraoperative catheter after induction of general anesthesia (n=241) or no catheter placement (control; n=250) at six centers from 2019 to 2021. Catheters were removed after the procedure. Follow-up was for 30 days after surgery and PUR, the primary outcome, was defined “as inability to urinate requiring direct catheterization, placement of an indwelling catheter, or return to emergencies due to inability to urinate after discharge from hospital”. hospital for up to 30 days after the operation.”

Participants underwent laparoscopic, elective, unilateral or bilateral primary (90%) or recurrent (10%) inguinal hernia repair. The study was single-blind and patients were excluded if they were intolerant to general anesthesia. Preoperative voiding was required, along with other standard surgical procedures.

The median patient age was 61 years, almost all were male (95%), the median body mass index was 26%, and 17% had benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Common comorbidities were hypertension (35%) and diabetes (5%).

Just under a quarter had unilateral left-sided inguinal hernias, 37% had unilateral right-sided inguinal hernias, and 39% had bilateral inguinal hernias; 12% had a scrotal component.

With a median operating time of 73 minutes, 72% of surgeries were performed using the total extraperitoneal technique and 28% using the transabdominal preperitoneal approach. More than two-thirds were treated with an indwelling catheter for urinary retention and were discharged from hospital the same day.

An exploratory multivariate analysis revealed that certain risk factors were associated with the development of PUR: age greater than 65 years, BPH, inoperative use of anticholinergic drugs, and volume of intraoperative crystalloid infusion. But a post hoc analysis found that placement of a urinary catheter did not reduce PUR in these groups.

Among the catheter group, one patient with PUR resulting in suprapubic catheter placement suffered postoperative urethral trauma. No intraoperative bladder injury occurred. No difference was observed in the timing of diagnosis and treatment of PUR between the two groups.

Limitations of the study included that the criteria for the timing of bladder scans and the decision to catheterize patients were not standardized across centers. Patients with BPH were also underrepresented. Finally, the sample size was small and unmeasured confounders could have impacted the results.

  • Zaina Hamza is a writer for MedPage Today, covering gastroenterology and infectious diseases. She is based in Chicago.

Disclosures

Fafaj revealed support from the Abdominal Core Health Quality Collaborative. The co-authors disclosed relationships with Abdominal Core Health Quality Collaborative, Dickinson, Intuitive Surgical, Medtronic, Becton, and Pacira.

Almquist revealed Ipsen’s support.

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St. Vincent’s Medical Center leads New England in advanced technology for brain and spine surgeries https://rhinoplastydigest.com/st-vincents-medical-center-leads-new-england-in-advanced-technology-for-brain-and-spine-surgeries/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 17:43:11 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/st-vincents-medical-center-leads-new-england-in-advanced-technology-for-brain-and-spine-surgeries/ Hartford HealthCare St. Vincent Medical Center in Bridgeport is the first hospital in New England to use Synaptive’s Modus V™ 3D exoscope technology for brain and spine surgeries. Modus V is a robotic digital microscope that uses artificial intelligence to combine state-of-the-art engineering with the latest advances in optics, video processing and robotic automation. “At […]]]>

Hartford HealthCare St. Vincent Medical Center in Bridgeport is the first hospital in New England to use Synaptive’s Modus V™ 3D exoscope technology for brain and spine surgeries.

Modus V is a robotic digital microscope that uses artificial intelligence to combine state-of-the-art engineering with the latest advances in optics, video processing and robotic automation.

“At Hartford HealthCare’s Ayer Neuroscience Institute, we are committed to treating our patients with the most advanced and innovative techniques and technologies to ensure the best possible outcomes with the least risk,” said Khalid Abbed. , MD, co-chief physician at the Ayer Neuroscience Institute who performed the first surgery using exoscope technology – a lumbar spine decompression. “This impressive technology allows the surgeon to navigate the sensitive structures of the brain and spinal cord in an unprecedented way. The Ayer Neuroscience Institute is always advancing neurosurgical and spinal care, and being the first in New England to offer this innovative technology is another example.

The Modus V provides the surgeon with a 3D visualization of the operating field. It offers more depth of field than traditional surgical microscopes and has twice the magnification of comparable microscopes.

Unlike traditional microscopes, the Modus V allows everyone in the operating room to experience what the surgeon is viewing in 3D on 55-inch 4K Ultra HD monitors. This helps improve workflow and collaboration within the surgical team, which ultimately results in better patient outcomes.

“Neurosurgery is all about precision,” said Vijay Yanamadala, MD, FAANS, Medical Director of Spine Quality and Surgical Optimization. “A millimeter can have an impact on the outcome for patients. We are committed to using all the tools and technology we can to have the safest and most effective surgery. »

The exoscope will be used for a wide range of procedures including lumbar decompression, laminectomy, discectomy, spinal tumors and cranial procedures such as brain tumors and aneurysms.

“With the improved view of the operating field, we will be able to perform the surgery more efficiently, which in turn will lead to a shorter length of stay and faster recovery for the patient,” said Yanamadala Dr. “We know that the less time spent in the operating room, the less chance there is of complications.”


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Applying antibiotic powder to fresh wounds to aid healing may trigger ulceration, surgeon warns https://rhinoplastydigest.com/applying-antibiotic-powder-to-fresh-wounds-to-aid-healing-may-trigger-ulceration-surgeon-warns/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 01:21:31 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/applying-antibiotic-powder-to-fresh-wounds-to-aid-healing-may-trigger-ulceration-surgeon-warns/ Angela Onwuzoo A Professor of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Mike Ogirima, has warned Nigerians against applying antibiotic powder to fresh wounds, noting that the practice cannot help healing. Prof Ogirima noted that applying antibiotic powder to fresh wounds to aid healing is unscientific, noting that those who indulge in it […]]]>

Angela Onwuzoo

A Professor of Orthopedic and Trauma Surgery at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Mike Ogirima, has warned Nigerians against applying antibiotic powder to fresh wounds, noting that the practice cannot help healing.

Prof Ogirima noted that applying antibiotic powder to fresh wounds to aid healing is unscientific, noting that those who indulge in it are just wasting their money and exposing the wounds to ulceration and possible infection.

According to the orthopedic surgeon, there is no scientific basis for treating fresh wounds with antibiotic powder, warning that applying such concoctions and other topical concoctions to fresh wounds could cause them to escalate into chronic wounds.

Professor Ogirima, former President of the Nigerian Medical Association, said so in an exclusive interview with PUNCH Healthwise.

He blamed illiteracy for the practice of treating fresh wounds with antibiotics, noting that anyone who engages in the act is unaware of how to manage wounds.

The professor urged injured patients to seek proper treatment from doctors, noting that seeking treatment from quacks could lead to further serious complications.

He explained: “Wounds are usually a defect in the skin. When there is a defect in the skin, whether intentional or accidental, it will cause the underlying structure under the skin to be exposed.

“Applying concoction and all sorts of things to wounds is quackery. If you don’t know what you’re treating, that means you don’t have the basics to treat it.

“Wounds have different categories and any wound that persists in the body for more than six weeks is called a chronic wound. We also have acute wounds.

“Now the treatment of fresh cuts on the skin is different. There is a lot of illiteracy and ignorance in the practice where people start applying all sorts of unorthodox things to a fresh cut.

“Ideally, a fresh wound once inflicted by a surgeon or accidental should be cleaned and affixed.”

He explained that there are different categories of wound sizes that might need to be assisted to facilitate their healing.

He noted that the human body can naturally heal any type of injury.

“We have this natural ingredient in the body that will heal any injury.

“We have this natural ingredient in the body that will heal any injury.

“But when we need to help in the healing process, we need to follow several factors to help a wound heal.

“Factors include; attend to the wound as soon as possible, close the wound if it has been cleaned, and the procedure for closing the wound varies between surgical procedures.

“So the idea of ​​having all kinds of substances, whether it’s ampicillin powder, antibiotic powder or any other type of powder, doesn’t exist.

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