Medical surgery – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:59:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-08T154233.528.png Medical surgery – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ 32 32 Pancreatic Diseases Program | NYU Langone Health https://rhinoplastydigest.com/pancreatic-diseases-program-nyu-langone-health/ Mon, 16 May 2022 21:13:03 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/pancreatic-diseases-program-nyu-langone-health/ Physicians in NYU Langone’s Pancreatic Diseases Program are recognized leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the pancreas and in the care of those with or at risk for these diseases. We treat you as a whole person, with the goal of not only improving your health, but also supporting your well-being. Our […]]]>

Physicians in NYU Langone’s Pancreatic Diseases Program are recognized leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the pancreas and in the care of those with or at risk for these diseases. We treat you as a whole person, with the goal of not only improving your health, but also supporting your well-being.

Our team specializes in treating people with benign and malignant or cancerous diseases of the pancreas, including pancreatitis, pancreatic cysts, pancreatic tumors and, in close collaboration with our team of experts at the Perlmutter Cancer Center, pancreatic cancer. of the pancreas. Additionally, we offer genetic testing and counseling for people who may be at increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer due to family history or other risk factors.

Personalized and comprehensive care

Our multidisciplinary team of experts includes advanced gastroenterologists and endoscopists, pancreatic surgeons, oncology specialists, radiologists and others who bring a comprehensive patient-centered approach to your care.

We use the most sophisticated tests to provide you with a fast, accurate and specific diagnosis, which is essential for effective treatment. We then develop a treatment plan tailored to your condition and needs.

Preventive care is a cornerstone of our mission. Our team is expert in advanced endoscopic and surgical procedures that can prevent precancerous cysts from turning into cancer, as well as strategies that help prevent the recurrence of pancreatitis and other conditions.

Advanced processing options

Because we are part of a world-class academic medical center, we offer the newest and most innovative medical and surgical treatments as well as the newest therapies being evaluated in clinical trials. Our highly skilled advanced endoscopy team performs state-of-the-art endoscopic procedures to diagnose and treat pancreatitis, pancreatic cysts, and certain pancreatic tumors.

Some pancreatic conditions may require surgery. Our internationally renowned hepatobiliary and pancreatic surgeons are among the most experienced in the world. Together they have performed thousands of complex surgeries, including pancreatic duodenectomy or the Whipple procedure – a highly specialized procedure for removing cancer from the head of the pancreas – as well as total, distal and central pancreatectomies. Additionally, our surgical team members are eminent in the field for their skill and expertise in the removal of advanced pancreatic tumors generally considered inoperable.

Our team is experienced in minimally invasive surgical procedures, including robotic and laparoscopic approaches, as well as traditional open surgery, all with excellent patient outcomes.

We are also specialized in pancreatic islet autograft for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis. In this procedure, the diseased pancreas is removed, but the islet cells – the cells that produce insulin – are returned to your liver. An autologous islet transplant reduces the risk of developing diabetes after a pancreatectomy.

Pancreatic cancer treatment

For people with pancreatic cancer, our multidisciplinary team offers the most advanced diagnostic and treatment options available. We tailor each treatment regimen we use, including surgery, chemotherapy, targeted therapy, immunotherapy and radiation therapy, to each person’s specific health condition and needs.

Clinical support services

The NYU Langone Pancreatic Disease Program team understands that pancreatic disease can affect different aspects of your health and well-being. We offer a comprehensive approach to your care that includes pain management, nutritional counseling and psychosocial support, which addresses the behavioural, social and psychological aspects of living with pancreatic disease.

Access to clinical trials

Our experts are at the forefront of using clinical trials to assess the effectiveness of promising new therapies and interventions for pancreatic conditions. People receiving care through our program have access to these studies. Your doctor can determine if enrollment in a clinical trial is right for you.

See our active trials in the following areas:

For questions regarding our pancreatic cancer clinical trials, contact Pamela Baga, NP, at pamela.baga@nyulangone.org or Chelsea Garcia, Senior Clinical Research Coordinator, at chelsea.garcia@nyulangone.org.

For questions about clinical trials for other pancreatic conditions, contact Emil Agarunov at emil.agarunov@nyulangone.org.

Research on pancreatic diseases

Our team helps advance our understanding of pancreatic diseases, discover ways to detect them earlier, and design new, more effective treatments. As part of these efforts, we offer each person we treat the opportunity to participate in our long-term research.

Our management

The Pancreatic Diseases Program is led by gastroenterologist and advanced endoscopy specialist Tamas A. Gonda, MD; medical oncologist Paul E. Oberstein, MD; and surgeons Diane M. Simeone, MD, and Christopher Wolfgang, MD, PhD.

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Extremity Medical partners with Dr. Joel Vernois to develop new minimally invasive surgical techniques for foot and ankle surgery https://rhinoplastydigest.com/extremity-medical-partners-with-dr-joel-vernois-to-develop-new-minimally-invasive-surgical-techniques-for-foot-and-ankle-surgery/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:36:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/extremity-medical-partners-with-dr-joel-vernois-to-develop-new-minimally-invasive-surgical-techniques-for-foot-and-ankle-surgery/ PARSIPPANY, NJ, May 13, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Extremity Medical, a global medical device company focused on developing innovative upper and lower extremity implants and instruments, today announced that Dr. Joel Vernois has partnered with Extremity Medical to develop new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques and specialized instrumentation techniques for foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Vernois will also […]]]>

PARSIPPANY, NJ, May 13, 2022–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Extremity Medical, a global medical device company focused on developing innovative upper and lower extremity implants and instruments, today announced that Dr. Joel Vernois has partnered with Extremity Medical to develop new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques and specialized instrumentation techniques for foot and ankle surgery. Dr. Vernois will also help Extremity Medical develop medical education courses focused on these MIS techniques.

Dr. Vernois brings over 20 years of clinical, academic and industrial experience. He is a specialist in foot and ankle surgery and one of the leading innovators in MIS techniques. He has developed specific MIS procedures for chevron osteotomies as well as mid and hindfoot procedures. He developed the PROStep™ surgical technique for Wright Medical which is now the standard for minimally invasive distal bunion surgery. Dr. Vernois is a teacher who has trained surgeons in these techniques all over the world.

Matthew Lyons, CEO, Founder and Chairman of the Board of Extremity Medical, said, “Extremity Medical is focused on developing MIS techniques that can provide significant benefits to patients, such as minimal scars, less pain and faster recovery time. Dr Vernois Expertise in this area will be instrumental in helping Extremity Medical commercialize these techniques. »

Dr. Vernois was trained in France at the Jules Verne University of Picardy and held a management position in the orthopedic department of the University Hospital of Amiens, France, until 2015. He is currently a surgeon orthopedic consultant at the Sussex Orthopedic NHS treatment center in the UK. where he has been since 2008 and works in a private practice in Paris at the Institute of Foot Surgery (Institut de La Cheville et du Pied, Paris 75015). He is the past president of the Minimally Invasive Foot and Ankle Society (MIFAS) and the Minimally Invasive Foot Surgery Research Group. He has authored or co-authored over 40 journal articles and book chapters.

Dr. Vernois obtained a doctorate in medicine and general surgery from the University of Amiens in 1999 and graduated in foot and ankle surgery from the University of Paris in 2002. He also obtained additional diplomas in specialties of Orthopedic Traumatology, Forensic Medicine, Spine Pathology, Clinical Methodology and Epidemiology, and Biomechanics.

About Extremity Medical, LLC
Extremity Medical, LLC, was founded in 2008 and is a privately held medical device company based in Parsippany, NJ. The company is known for creating innovative implants and instruments for upper and lower limb orthopedic procedures, including fusion and motion preservation. The company is focused on developing solutions for difficult cases that promote better outcomes, especially in patients with poor bone quality.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220513005037/en/

contacts

Ira Benson
Vice President of Marketing
973-588-8980

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Texas joins Alabama law to ban child gender-affirming care https://rhinoplastydigest.com/texas-joins-alabama-law-to-ban-child-gender-affirming-care/ Wed, 11 May 2022 21:02:42 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/texas-joins-alabama-law-to-ban-child-gender-affirming-care/ AUSTIN (Nexstar) — Texas is now part of a multistate amicus brief, supporting Alabama’s Vulnerable Child Protection Act. It would specifically ban “puberty blockers, cross-sex hormones, and surgery to cosmetically alter children and adolescents to facilitate their ‘gender transition,'” according to a press release from Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office. The amicus memoir states that […]]]>

AUSTIN (Nexstar) — Texas is now part of a multistate amicus brief, supporting Alabama’s Vulnerable Child Protection Act.

It would specifically ban “puberty blockers, cross-sex hormones, and surgery to cosmetically alter children and adolescents to facilitate their ‘gender transition,'” according to a press release from Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office.

The amicus memoir states that Alabama and the states supporting their act are concerned about the recent increase in “gender-related psychological problems among adolescents and the corresponding rush by some practitioners to provide these vulnerable young people with life-changing drugs and surgical treatments life”.

Also argued in the briefing, there is no requirement in hormonal facilities to conduct an assessment of children who identify as transgender.

“I support any law in any state that protects vulnerable children from the sexual predations of the left,” Paxton said. “I’m confident that Alabama law will stand up to judicial scrutiny and I’m proud to help.”

A group of more than 20 medical and scientific groups also filed an amicus brief in early May supporting the idea of ​​giving all children, including those with gender dysphoria, equal access to care. medical and mental.

In the amicus brief, the medical groups state, “The Court should consider the amicus brief because it provides important expertise and corrects inaccuracies regarding the treatment of transgender adolescents.”

According to health professionals, their groups represent thousands of health care providers who have expertise and experience with transgender youth.

“To deny such evidence-based medical care to adolescents who meet the required medical criteria puts them at risk of significant harm to their mental health,” the medical professionals’ amicus brief states. “Legislative findings of the health care ban misrepresent well-accepted medical guidelines for the treatment of gender dysphoria in adolescents and the evidence supporting the guidelines.”

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iSTAR Medical Expands Commercial Deployment with First https://rhinoplastydigest.com/istar-medical-expands-commercial-deployment-with-first/ Tue, 10 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/istar-medical-expands-commercial-deployment-with-first/ For immediate release iSTAR Medical Expands Commercial deployment with First MINIject® surgeries in Swiss The only commercially available MIGS device currently targeting the supraciliary space now available for patients and surgeons in Switzerland First locations interpreted by Teacher. Doctor Kaweh Mansouri to Visio Switzerland, Clinic of Montchoisi, Lausanne and teacher. Doctor med. Jan Darius Unterlauft […]]]>

For immediate release

iSTAR Medical Expands Commercial deployment with First MINIject® surgeries in Swiss

  • The only commercially available MIGS device currently targeting the supraciliary space now available for patients and surgeons in Switzerland
  • First locations interpreted by Teacher. Doctor Kaweh Mansouri to Visio Switzerland, Clinic of Montchoisi, Lausanne and teacher. Doctor med. Jan Darius Unterlauft at InselspitalBern

WAVRE, Belgium — ten May 2022: iSTAR Medical, a medical technology company providing breakthrough eye care solutions to patients, today announced the continued expansion of its commercial deployment for MINIject® to Switzerland. MINIject® is iSTAR Medical’s minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) implant and currently the only commercially available supraciliary MIGS device. Swiss patients with open-angle glaucoma can now benefit from MINIject®which has demonstrated significant and sustained performance, combined with a favorable safety profile.

The first implants with MINIject® have now been successfully completed at Swiss Visio, Clinique de Montchoisi, Lausanne by Prof. Dr Kaweh Mansouri and Inselspital, Bern by Prof. Dr. med. Jan Darius Unterlauft. This follows the recent expansion of MINIject by iSTAR Medical® in the UK in March.

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible blindness, affecting around 100 million people worldwide and around 10 million in Europe alone.1,2 MIGS represents the most promising and fastest growing treatment for glaucoma, due to its improved safety profile compared to traditional surgery.1

Teacher. Dr Kaweh Mansouriglaucoma specialist (Lausanne) commented:Glaucoma is a growing problem in increasingly aging Swiss population, with the incidence of glaucoma rising from 2% of people above old 50 at 5-8% in people over 70. Access to MINIject will now allow me to offer a novel and a safe a bit intrusive surgical approach to my patients, postponing more invasive surgery and preserving vision longer.

Teacher. Doctor med. Jan Darius Unterlauft (Bern) commented:I am delighted to be able to offer MINIject for patients currently living withangle glaucoma. This innovative MIGS device, with its distinctive STAR material, provides a clear thrive to my the patients for reachand the right balance of significant intraocular pressure reduction with favorable security, supported longer term.

Michel Vanbrabant, CEO of iSTAR Medical, commented: Following our recent expansion in the UK, our deployment in Switzerland further away executed our engagement provide patients and surgeons through Europe access to MINIject, currently the only commercially available MIGS device targeting the supraciliary space. With the timely addition of Switzerland, we are well on our way to preserving the vision of glaucoma patients across Europe.”

– Ends –

For more information
Katherine Awad
Marketing Manager, iSTAR Medical
news@istarmed.com; +32 10 77 16 54

For the media
Consilium Strategic Communications
Amber Fennell, Chris Welsh, Kris Lam
iSTAR@consilium-comms.com

About iSTAR Medical
iSTAR Medical is committed to providing breakthrough eye care solutions. Our most advanced product, MINIject®, is approved in Europe for the treatment of open-angle glaucoma – the leading cause of irreversible blindness – and we are aiming to gain market approval in the United States. We believe that MINIject®The distinctive tissue integration capabilities of provide a safer and more efficient option for patients. We are building an exceptional team and a pipeline of potentially leading products such as MINIject® establishing new treatment paradigms in eye care conditions with the highest patient needs. For more information, visit: www.istar-medical.com

About MINIject®
MINIject® is iSTAR Medical’s innovative MIGS device for patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. MINIject® combines the distinctive porous structure of its exclusive STAR material with the power offered by the supraciliary space. As a result, it is designed to improve natural fluid flow, reduce intraocular pressure (IOP) and the need for medication, while integrating with surrounding tissues, limiting inflammation, fibrosis and subsequent complications.

About Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a progressive disease that affects more than 100 million people worldwide, of which primary open-angle glaucoma is the most common form.1,2 Reducing IOP, through medication or surgery, helps delay the progression of the disease.3 Medications are usually the first-line treatment, but adding more drops gradually can burden patients with side effects, compliance issues, and costs.1,3 Invasive surgery can present risks of irreversible complications and often requires long-term management of the patient.1,3 MIGS is the most promising and fastest growing treatment for glaucoma due to its improved safety profile.1 We believe that MINIject® could become a leading MIGS device with its promising long-term efficacy and safety.


1 Market Scope, “2021 Glaucoma Surgical Device Market Report”, July 2021. https://www.market-scope.com/pages/reports/267/2021-glaucoma-surgical-device-market-report
2 Jonas JB, Aung T, Bourne RR et al. “Glaucoma”. Lancet 2017; 390: 2083–93
3 “European Glaucoma Society terminology and guidelines for glaucoma”, 4th edition: British Journal of Ophthalmology. 2017;101:1-195 https://bjo.bmj.com/content/101/5/73

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Hip resurfacing an alternative to hip replacement surgery https://rhinoplastydigest.com/hip-resurfacing-an-alternative-to-hip-replacement-surgery/ Fri, 06 May 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/hip-resurfacing-an-alternative-to-hip-replacement-surgery/ Dear Doctors: My eldest brother has worked in construction all his life, and now he has severe arthritis in his left hip. He was in enough pain that he finally consulted his doctor about it. Instead of a hip replacement, they want to do a hip resurfacing. What is that? Will it be as effective? […]]]>

Dear Doctors: My eldest brother has worked in construction all his life, and now he has severe arthritis in his left hip. He was in enough pain that he finally consulted his doctor about it. Instead of a hip replacement, they want to do a hip resurfacing. What is that? Will it be as effective?

Dear reader: Hip resurfacing is a type of hip replacement surgery.

The most common reason a person needs this type of surgery is advanced osteoarthritis. Also known as “wear and tear arthritis”, it is common in older people and in certain occupations.

Hip osteoarthritis can cause pain severe enough to limit mobility and interfere with daily activities.

The hip is a ball and socket joint, which allows the range of motion that we have in our legs. The rounded top of the femur, the largest bone in the leg, forms the ball. This is the femoral head. It fits into a cup-shaped socket in the pelvis, the acetabulum. The ball and socket are covered in smooth cartilage, allowing them to slide past each other painlessly.

With osteoarthritis, this cartilage gradually wears away, making movement painful.

When non-surgical approaches to managing osteoarthritis pain are not successful, hip replacement surgery is often recommended.

In a traditional hip replacement, the femoral head and acetabulum are removed, replaced with plastic, ceramic, and sometimes metal components.

With hip resurfacing, the damaged bone and cartilage of the femoral head and acetabulum are removed. The surgeon then lines the socket with a metal shell and covers the femoral head with a smooth metal cap.

Benefits over total hip replacement include faster recovery, improved mobility, and reduced risk of hip dislocation. It is also easier to replace implants if they wear out or fail.

But there are downsides. One is the risk of femoral neck fracture, which occurs in a small number of hip resurfacing patients. This requires a full hip replacement. The other is called metal ion risk. Since hip resurfacing uses two metal components, the resulting friction can, over time, cause the release of tiny metal molecules that can cause pain and swelling, which may require further surgery.

Ions can also travel throughout the body via the bloodstream and have been linked to adverse effects on the heart, nervous system, thyroid, and cancer. Metal ion risk is a potential complication of traditional hip replacements that use a metal ball and metal socket.

Dr. Eve Glazier and Dr. Elizabeth Ko are internists at UCLA Health.

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Even when IVF is covered, high bills and hassles abound: https://rhinoplastydigest.com/even-when-ivf-is-covered-high-bills-and-hassles-abound/ Wed, 04 May 2022 09:00:50 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/even-when-ivf-is-covered-high-bills-and-hassles-abound/ Oona Tempest / Kaiser Health News Oona Tempest / Kaiser Health News After years of unsuccessfully trying for a baby, Brenna Kaminski and her husband, Joshua Pritt, decided to try in vitro fertilization. Only 15 states need insurance to cover fertility treatments, and Florida, where Kaminski and Pritt live, is not one of them. Yet […]]]>

Oona Tempest / Kaiser Health News

Woman with medical bill

Oona Tempest / Kaiser Health News

After years of unsuccessfully trying for a baby, Brenna Kaminski and her husband, Joshua Pritt, decided to try in vitro fertilization.

Only 15 states need insurance to cover fertility treatments, and Florida, where Kaminski and Pritt live, is not one of them. Yet the couple’s insurance, from Pritt’s job at an energy company, did — putting them among the lucky minority of Americans whose insurance plan covers the expensive fertility procedure. Kaminski and Pritt calculated what their share of the cost would be for an IVF cycle: $2,700, the maximum paid out under their policy.

Instead, after many twists and turns with two specialty practices, they paid over $15,000 for two cycles of IVF, including all medications. And, as is the case with the majority of procedures nationally (success rates range from 12% to 49% depending on patient age), neither cycle resulted in a viable pregnancy. “It’s all been a nightmare,” said Kaminski, 37, who does freelance marketing and writing. “The stress has been unbelievable.”

On 1 in 5 women struggle to get pregnant, and IVF has become a common route to parenthood for many. But even if the demand increases, the insurance cover remains limited. Around 27% of companies with 500 or more employees covered IVF in 2020, up from around 24% in 2015, according to Mercera consulting company.

“Infertility is a disease and should be treated as such, and insurance coverage should take this into account,” said Dr Kara Goldman, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Northwestern University. “Coverage is often incomplete because too often people don’t see infertility as equal to other illnesses.”

Kaminski’s insurer, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, offered a list of in-network IVF providers near the couple’s home in Melbourne, Florida. For in-network care, the couple would be responsible for 20% of the costs. For out-of-network care, they would have to pay 40%.

The first networking specialists they tried, in the spring of 2020, had an office nearby in Viera, Florida. But after seeing the doctor, they learned they had to travel 3.5 hours to Miami, where the doctor performed the IVF procedures over three separate periods. visits.

KHN-Logo

The couple paid around $2,700 out of pocket for the drugs alone. They also paid an additional $500 because the fertility clinic required them to use an out-of-network lab for blood tests.

In November 2020, the couple decided to try again, with another fertility medical group listed in their network of Blue Cross providers. It was in Winter Park, Florida, about an hour’s drive from their home.

Kaminski visited doctors at the Center for Reproductive Medicine and they scheduled him to start the procedure at their facility in the same building. But this establishment, the Orlando Avenue Surgery Center, was not part of the Blue Cross network.

Kaminski said the surgery center told her he was likely to be added to the Blue Cross network soon, and she asked the insurer for a waiver to have the center’s care considered part of the network. The insurer’s customer service agents told her she would get the waiver, but she did not get written confirmation. Still, she followed the procedure.

This took place in 2021 and Kaminski again expected to shell out around $2,700 for care from the IVF specialist in Winter Park. She knew she would face separate charges for the drugs used in IVF.

But because her care was deemed out-of-network by Blue Cross, Kaminski said, she was billed more than $6,000 by the clinic and its surgery center. This was in addition to nearly $4,000 in reimbursable drug costs.

Kaminski spent nearly a year trying to get Blue Cross to treat her second round of IVF as in-network. She said it was unfair that Blue Cross listed the Winter Park Fertility Clinic in its network of providers if its doctors performed the actual IVF procedure at an out-of-network surgery center. The surgery center is owned by some clinic doctors.

In a statement to KHN, the executive director of the Center for Reproductive Medicine, Stephen Brown, would not specifically address Kaminski’s case even if she had given him permission to discuss it. In an email, Brown wrote that the clinic was transparent with all of its patients and that its surgery center was not part of the Blue Cross network.

Brown said low reimbursement rates aren’t what kept the surgery center away from the Blue Cross network. Instead, he said, the insurer did not act quickly, taking more than four years to add the surgery center to its provider network. “The reason for not initially networking with BCBS was purely based on BCBS’s lack of response,” Brown said.

Prior to any treatment, Brown said, the clinic gives its patients cost estimates for their procedures based on their insurance. Kaminski received an estimate that she could expect to pay $3,000 to $4,000 just to transfer the lab-grown embryos to her womb.

In March 2021 – about a month after Kaminski completed treatment – ​​the Winter Park Surgery Center was added to Blue Cross’ provider network.

In February 2022, KHN contacted the supplier and the insurer. Within two weeks, Blue Cross told the couple that he would consider all of the services they received at the surgery center into the network, and he paid all of his bills in full. Kaminski and Pritt no longer owed anything to the center. Blue Cross originally said it would pay a nominal portion of the disputed bills that totaled $21,450 for care in 2020 and 2021 because the surgery center was out of the network.

Blue Cross also confirmed to the couple that in January 2021 it granted them a waiver so that all bills from the surgery center could be considered part of the network. By mistake, the waiver had not been applied, so they faced high out-of-network charges.

“It finally makes sense,” Pritt said after learning their billing dispute had been resolved. “It’s good to know that we won’t have any more bills.”

After Blue Cross decided to cover IVF in Winter Park, the couple received $1,600 from the Orlando Avenue Surgery Center.

John Simleya spokesperson for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois, said, “With non-routine waivers, errors can occur. The good news is that they are usually corrected quickly.”

In this case, however, it took almost a year.

Experts say Kaminski’s case shows that even when people have IVF coverage, they can end up with huge bills. In addition, the lists of network provider insurers are not always accurate. “It feels like a bait and switch,” said Sabrina Corlette, research professor and co-director of the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at Georgetown University.

A new federal insurance law, the No Surprises Act, came into effect in January 2022. It states that patients do not have to pay more than the in-network cost-sharing amount if the provider directory of the insurer provided inaccurate information.

It is unclear whether the law would apply in cases such as those of Kaminski and Pritt. Even if it was, the law came into force too late for them.

Betsy Campbell, head of engagement at Resolve: The National Infertility Association, a patient advocacy organization, said Kaminski’s case shows insurance coverage isn’t always designed around the patient. “The treatment of infertility is a series of very complex procedures involving laboratory work, surgery, anesthesia, and it must be provided in a way that the insurance system has not always respected. “, she said.

Too often, insurance forces a couple to take steps to get the care they need, Campbell said. “Everyone should have the right to have a family, and it doesn’t matter what employer you work for, what state you live in, or how much check you can write,” Campbell said.

Kaminski and Pritt aren’t giving up on having kids. For now, they are pursuing other fertility treatments that are not IVF.

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues. It is an editorially independent operating program of KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation).

Bill of the Month is a participatory survey conducted by KHN and NPR who dissects and explains medical bills. Do you have an interesting medical bill that you want to share with us? Tell us about it!

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Tottenham stat Reguilon could need surgery after ‘huge’ news https://rhinoplastydigest.com/tottenham-stat-reguilon-could-need-surgery-after-huge-news/ Mon, 02 May 2022 16:34:44 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/tottenham-stat-reguilon-could-need-surgery-after-huge-news/ Tottenham defender Sergio Reguilon may need surgery at the end of the season to correct a groin problem. That’s the view of injury expert Ben Dinnery, who leads the First order injuries site and has a background in medicine and data analysis. Reguilon, 25, was benched for Spurs’ 0-0 draw with Brentford on April 23 […]]]>

Tottenham defender Sergio Reguilon may need surgery at the end of the season to correct a groin problem.

That’s the view of injury expert Ben Dinnery, who leads the First order injuries site and has a background in medicine and data analysis.

Reguilon, 25, was benched for Spurs’ 0-0 draw with Brentford on April 23 and missed Leicester City completely yesterday (May 1).

As quoted by club media Ahead of the game, Antonio Conte said the left-back was suffering from ‘groin pain’ and it was ‘important to find a solution’.

Dinnery claimed the Spaniard could be patched up until the end of the campaign and then go under the knife.

“Players at this stage of the season are going to have little knocks and trouble,” he said Football Insiderit’s Adam Williams.

“The prevalence of groin pain is high due to the dynamic nature of sport.

“It is extremely important to try to find a solution. That could mean managing it conservatively until the summer.

“That way, any procedure that might be needed can be done over the summer.

“Given they’ve already lost Matt Doherty, they might just need to make him available as a back-up if needed.”

This site revealed last Thursday (April 28) that Tottenham will listen to offers for Reguilon this summer.

Oliver Skipp, Matt Doherty and Japhet Tanganga are also ruled out for Spurs, who are two points off the top four with four games to go.

In other news, an expert says ‘abysmal’ the outgoing Tottenham chief ‘good riddance’ after confirmed news.

Medical expert: Ryan Fraser injury ‘worse than we thought’ after last Newcastle

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Austin surgeon receives Distinguished Service Award from Texas Medical Association https://rhinoplastydigest.com/austin-surgeon-receives-distinguished-service-award-from-texas-medical-association/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 22:15:06 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/austin-surgeon-receives-distinguished-service-award-from-texas-medical-association/ HOUSTON – An Austin surgeon and former Texas Medical Association president received the organization’s highest honor at its annual conference. David C. Fleeger, MD received the 2022 TMA Distinguished Service Award at the TexMed Conference in Houston. “I’m sure every recipient of this award felt like me: honored and humbled,” Fleeger said in a statement. […]]]>

An Austin surgeon and former Texas Medical Association president received the organization’s highest honor at its annual conference.

David C. Fleeger, MD received the 2022 TMA Distinguished Service Award at the TexMed Conference in Houston.

“I’m sure every recipient of this award felt like me: honored and humbled,” Fleeger said in a statement. “I don’t really consider what I’ve done as ‘distinguished’. I consider myself a doctor in the trenches every day, trying to be a good doctor and a good surgeon.”

Fleeger, a colon and rectal surgeon, was the association’s 154th president halfway through his term the COVID-19 pandemic hit. As the state managed the distribution of PPE to hospitals and healthcare entities, private practices were initially neglected, so he and other TMA leaders worked with Texas Division of Emergency Management (TDEM) responsible for establishing a system to distribute more than 23 million masks to doctors across the state.

“I can’t think of a time in my career when I’ve been prouder both of doctors and the health professions in general, and certainly of our association,” said Dr Fleeger, who also chaired the Texas COVID-19 Health Industry Strike Force, a collaboration of leaders from hospitals, nurses, academics, public health, long-term care and other groups.

Dr. Fleeger still practices medicine full-time in his nine-member group practice in Austin.

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Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol https://rhinoplastydigest.com/enhanced-recovery-after-surgery-eras-protocol/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 17:54:11 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/enhanced-recovery-after-surgery-eras-protocol/ The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol is a new approach to surgery preparation and recovery that can help you heal faster, avoid complications, and be less dependent on narcotic pain medications. Part of the ERAS protocol is to drink nutritional supplements until the day of your surgery. You will also start taking non-narcotic pain […]]]>

The Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) Protocol is a new approach to surgery preparation and recovery that can help you heal faster, avoid complications, and be less dependent on narcotic pain medications.

Part of the ERAS protocol is to drink nutritional supplements until the day of your surgery. You will also start taking non-narcotic pain relievers to jump-start your pain control response.

Medical studies have shown that taking certain steps before and after your surgery — guided by a team of caregivers each with their own specialties — can help you get home faster and get back to the post-surgery life you were hoping for.

Two weeks before surgery

If you are currently taking an anticoagulant, antiplatelet, or blood thinner, you should contact the prescribing physician and your surgeon to find out when to stop the medication before surgery. These drugs may include aspirin, Plavix (clopidogrel), Coumadin (warfarin), Eliquis (apixaban), or Xarelto (rivaroxaban).

Stop all decongestants, nasal sprays, Alka-Seltzer, Pepto Bismol, vitamins, diet pills, and herbal supplements.

Seven days before surgery

Stop taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. This includes naproxen (Aleve), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), meloxicam (Mobic), oral or gel diclofenac, and celecoxib (Celebrex).

Five days before surgery

If someone from the pre-admission tests hasn’t called you yet, call (502) 446-8660.

Start using Bactroban (mupirocin) nasal ointment once in the morning and once in the evening. A prescription for this medication will be sent to your pharmacy before your surgery date. Put a pea-sized amount on a cotton swab and apply it inside each nostril. (In case of redness, irritation, allergy or intolerance to medication, inform your surgeon and stop using the ointment.)

Four days before surgery

Continue to use Bactroban (mupirocin) nasal ointment, once in the morning and once in the evening.

Stop shaving at or around your surgical site.

Shower with chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) soap using a clean washcloth. Wash first with your usual soap, then with the CHG, leaving the CHG on your skin for one minute before rinsing off with warm water. Dry with a clean towel. Keep CHG soap out of your eyes, ears, nose, and mouth and away from your genitals. Stop using CHG if you have an allergic reaction. If this happens, switch to an antibacterial soap, such as Dial. Dry yourself off with a clean towel.

Three days before surgery

Continue to use Bactroban (mupirocin) nasal ointment, once in the morning and once in the evening.

Shower with CHG using a clean washcloth. Dry yourself off with a clean towel.

Two days before surgery

Continue to use Bactroban (mupirocin) nasal ointment, once in the morning and once in the evening.

Shower with CHG cleanser using a clean washcloth. Dry yourself off with a clean towel.

One day before surgery

Finish by using Bactroban (mupirocin) nasal ointment, once in the morning and once in the evening.

Shower with CHG using a clean washcloth. Dry yourself off with a clean towel.

Put on clean pajamas and sleep on clean sheets.

Follow the instructions for your medications.

Remove all jewelry (including wedding rings) and leave them at home.

  • 8:00 p.m.: Drink a pre-op nutrition drink.
  • 10:00 p.m.: Drink a pre-op nutrition drink.
  • At bedtime: Take 1,000 milligrams of acetaminophen (Tylenol).
  • Do not eat after midnight.
  • Do not smoke or use tobacco after midnight.

Day of surgery

Follow your medication instructions as discussed with your pre-admission testing nurse.

Two hours before your scheduled surgery time, drink your last pre-op nutrition drink.

Do not drink anything for two hours before your surgery, including water and coffee.

Shower with CHG just before leaving for the hospital, using a clean washcloth and pat dry with a clean towel.

Do not use mascara, makeup, lotion, powder, perfume, deodorant or aftershave.

Bring your continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine, inhalers, goggles (non-contact), dentures and hearing aids, if you use them.

Bring photo ID, your insurance card and a copayment, if you have one.

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No standard set for minimum surgeries to be performed by PG students: National Medical Commission | Nagpur News https://rhinoplastydigest.com/no-standard-set-for-minimum-surgeries-to-be-performed-by-pg-students-national-medical-commission-nagpur-news/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/no-standard-set-for-minimum-surgeries-to-be-performed-by-pg-students-national-medical-commission-nagpur-news/ Nagpur: Based on an RTI response by the National Medical Commission (NMC) to his queries, a Punjab-based doctor alleged that more than 80% of medical colleges in the country award degrees without teaching surgeries and procedures to Master of Surgery (MS) and Doctor of Medicine (MD) students during the three-year postgraduate training. In its response, […]]]>
Nagpur: Based on an RTI response by the National Medical Commission (NMC) to his queries, a Punjab-based doctor alleged that more than 80% of medical colleges in the country award degrees without teaching surgeries and procedures to Master of Surgery (MS) and Doctor of Medicine (MD) students during the three-year postgraduate training.
In its response, the NMC stated that “there are no set guidelines regarding the number of surgeries that should be performed personally by an MS surgery during the three-year course.”
RTI candidate, Dr. Neeraj Nagpal, said that during his university studies, a master’s or medical degree is awarded depending on the skill level of a candidate. “Now we award degrees and certificates, but we don’t teach surgeries and procedures,” he said.
Dr. Nagpal said earlier that colleges would not award master’s or medical degrees until the candidate has demonstrated competence in performing surgery on an average patient. “Take any country’s training program and you’ll find MS degree criteria based on numbers of catheterization, endoscopy, laproscopy, etc.,” he said.
Dr. Nagpal recalled the process while studying at Christian Medical College in Ludhiana. “A freshman used to learn surgeries from his senior. The final year student was teaching the second year. By the time a PG medical student graduated, he used to be good at surgeries,” he said.
The internships and training programs designed by NMC are theory-based and they are as good as online courses, Dr. Nagpal said. “When the NMC has not defined any criteria for the practicals, then it must hold an online session only. According to NMC, a student just has to watch. In fact, an operation is best viewed on YouTube,” he said.
A qualified MBBS student is better than a degree holder without practical knowledge, he said. “The patient thinks you’re a medical specialist when the reality is that the degree holder may not know how to do cataract surgery,” he said.
Another query, Dr. Nagpal said, reveals that NMC has not established any regulations for the recognition of institutes based on the practical training they provide to MD/MS, MCh/DM trainees. The NMC has also not derecognized any medical school for the lack of such a training module, the response suggests.
As part of the Medico Legal Action Group (MLAG) with members across the country, Dr. Nagpal said they intend to bring about reform in medical education.
The city’s pulmonologist Dr. Rajesh Swarnakar said the Indian Chest Society and the National Medical Society were trying to fill the void by organizing certified courses in specific skills for these postgraduate students.
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