Medical surgery – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 06:20:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-08T154233.528.png Medical surgery – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ 32 32 CMR Surgical will build a new global manufacturing facility for https://rhinoplastydigest.com/cmr-surgical-will-build-a-new-global-manufacturing-facility-for/ Mon, 11 Oct 2021 06:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/cmr-surgical-will-build-a-new-global-manufacturing-facility-for/ CMR Surgical to build a new global manufacturing facility to meet Versius demand UK-based facility to become hub for global exports as company accelerates business expansion CAMBRIDGE, United Kingdom – 11 October 2021, 07:00 (GMT). CMR Surgical (CMR) – a global surgical robotics company – today announced plans to open a new large-scale manufacturing facility […]]]>

CMR Surgical to build a new global manufacturing facility to meet Versius demand

  • UK-based facility to become hub for global exports as company accelerates business expansion

CAMBRIDGE, United Kingdom 11 October 2021, 07:00 (GMT). CMR Surgical (CMR) – a global surgical robotics company – today announced plans to open a new large-scale manufacturing facility in Cambridgeshire, UK. Site will enable larger scale manufacturing processes to meet growing global demand for Versius® Surgical robotic system, now established as a valuable surgical tool in a number of hospitals in Europe, India, Australia and the Middle East.

Following the recent completion of the largest private MedTech funding round ever in the world, CMR remains focused on the ongoing commercial scale-up of Versius and strengthening its manufacturing capacity will help support this. At the same time, CMR is committed to investing in future technological developments of Versius and its digital ecosystem that will benefit surgeons and improve surgical care globally.

The new facility will cover 7,044.8 m². (75,832 square feet) and will house up to 200 employees initially qualified in production, quality, manufacturing engineering, procurement, operations and logistics. The site will be located in Ely, close to the company’s head office in Cambridge.

By Vegard Nerseth, Managing Director of CMR Surgical, said: “We continue to see strong demand for Versius in markets around the world and our commitment to build a new manufacturing facility reflects this while underscoring the breadth of our ambition to transform surgery. The Cambridgeshire workforce will be crucial in helping us deliver systems to benefit patients all over the world and we see this as an important development in our business growth strategy. ”

Barrington D’Arcy, Director of Operations at CMR Surgical, noted: “Establishing a world-class manufacturing facility to meet global demand was a logical step for CMR. Closely connecting our skilled workforce of manufacturing, R&D, sourcing and other important functions means we can bring together the best talent to deliver high-end commercial production for Versius. “

CMR has over 700 employees working in R&D, clinical, manufacturing, supply chain, commerce and services.

This UK investment strengthens CMR’s role in shaping innovation through surgical robotics to improve surgical care.

– ENDS –

Media contacts:

If you would like to see more, please contact CMR Surgical at:

Press office, CMR Surgical
T +44 (0) 1223 755801
E press office@cmrurgical.com

Mary-Jane Elliott / Angela Gray / Lindsey Neville
Consilium Strategic communication
T +44 (0) 20 3709 5700
E cmr@consilium-comms.com

Notes to editors:

The Versius® Surgical robotic system

Versius® resets expectations for robotic surgery. Versius fits into virtually any operating room setup and seamlessly integrates into existing workflows, increasing the likelihood of robotic minimal access (MAS) surgery. Versius’ portable and modular design allows the surgeon to use only the number of arms needed for a given procedure.

Mimicking the human arm, Versius offers surgeons the choice of optimized port placement as well as the dexterity and precision of small, all-wrist instruments. With 3D HD vision, easy-to-adopt instrument control, and a choice of ergonomic working positions, the open surgeon’s console has the potential to reduce stress and fatigue and enables clear communication with the surgical team. By laparoscopically thinking and operating robotically with Versius, patients, surgeons and healthcare professionals can all benefit from the value robotic ADS brings.

But it’s more than just a robot. Versius captures meaningful data with its larger digital ecosystem to support a surgeon’s lifelong learning. Through the Versius Connect app, Versius Trainer and the CMR Clinical Registry, Versius unlocks a wealth of information to improve surgical care.

About CMR Surgical Limited

CMR Surgical (CMR) is a global medical device company dedicated to transforming surgery with Versius®, a new generation surgical robot.

Based in Cambridge, UK, CMR is committed to working with surgeons, surgical teams and hospital partners, to provide an optimal tool for making minimum access robotic surgery universally accessible and affordable. With Versius, we are on a mission to redefine the surgical robotics market with practical and innovative technology and data that can improve surgical care.

Founded in 2014, CMR Surgical is a limited liability company backed by international shareholders.


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Hathras Case: PhD Student Needs Surgery, AIIMS-Delhi Doctors Say | Agra News https://rhinoplastydigest.com/hathras-case-phd-student-needs-surgery-aiims-delhi-doctors-say-agra-news/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 22:52:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/hathras-case-phd-student-needs-surgery-aiims-delhi-doctors-say-agra-news/ Agra: Doctoral student Atiq-ur-Rahman, 26, who was taken to AIIMS-Delhi for a medical examination on Friday, was advised to have surgery by doctors after several diagnostic tests were performed on him in the emergency room. However, he was released late at night and returned to Mathura prison. Rahman was taken to AIIMS two weeks after […]]]>
Agra: Doctoral student Atiq-ur-Rahman, 26, who was taken to AIIMS-Delhi for a medical examination on Friday, was advised to have surgery by doctors after several diagnostic tests were performed on him in the emergency room. However, he was released late at night and returned to Mathura prison.
Rahman was taken to AIIMS two weeks after a special court in Lucknow asked Mathura District Prison to provide “proper treatment”.
A doctoral student at Chaudhary Charan Singh University in Meerut, Rahman was arrested last year along with Kerala journalist Siddique Kappan and two others while traveling to Hathras district in Uttar Pradesh to meet with the family. of the rape victim. They were charged with sedition and subject to the Illegal Activities (Prevention) Act. Later, the execution department began to investigate the money laundering charges against them.
Rahman’s father-in-law Sakhawat Khan, who was also at AIIMS, told TOI doctors advised surgery as his condition is “critical” and estimated at Rs 2 lakh with 10 units of blood was given by them. .
Doctors asked her to go to the hospital after a week.
Confirming this, Prison Superintendent (Mathura) Brijesh Kumar, said he received the estimate and doctors requested follow-up after one week. “We will send the estimated request to the government for approval and follow up with AIIMS,” he added.
Rahman was taken to the Special Tribunal for the Prevention of Money Laundering Act for a hearing on September 22 when he fell ill. He was sent to a community health center, from where he was transferred to Agra District Hospital and then to SN Medical College.
Doctors there referred him to a higher center – Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGI) in Lucknow or AIIMS in Delhi. But the authorities took him back to prison.
Later, the prison authorities approved his examination at AIIMS.


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Study Shows Medicaid Expansion Has Increased Access To Bariatric Surgery For Obesity https://rhinoplastydigest.com/study-shows-medicaid-expansion-has-increased-access-to-bariatric-surgery-for-obesity/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 16:32:24 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/study-shows-medicaid-expansion-has-increased-access-to-bariatric-surgery-for-obesity/ Credit: Unsplash / CC0 Public domain Following the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), access to weight loss surgery as a treatment for obesity has increased by 31% per year for low-income white adults covered by Medicaid and uninsured ages 26 to 64, but not for Hispanic and black adults, according to […]]]>

Credit: Unsplash / CC0 Public domain

Following the expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), access to weight loss surgery as a treatment for obesity has increased by 31% per year for low-income white adults covered by Medicaid and uninsured ages 26 to 64, but not for Hispanic and black adults, according to research by scientists at the Wake Forest School of Medicine.

The National Institutes of Health-funded policy impact study is published in the October 8 edition of JAMA Health Forum.

“As the number of adults suffering from severe obesity continues to increase in the United States, weight loss surgery is the most effective treatment available,” said lead author Amresh D. Hanchate, Ph.D., professor of public health sciences at Wake Forest. Medicine School.

“The rapid increase and high rate of obesity in the United States, especially among low-income and underserved populations, has exacerbated the disease burden, poor quality of life, premature death and the costs of care. health. As an elective procedure primarily for people under 65, bariatric surgery is a marker of access to health care for both primary clinicians and medical specialists. “

In addition to improving quality of life and conditions associated with obesity such as diabetes, hypertension, and sleep apnea, several studies have shown that bariatric surgery can also result in net cost savings for patients. lifelong health care, Hanchate added.

The aim of the study was to examine the association between the expansion of Medicaid and the rate of inpatient elective bariatric surgery in low-income people aged 26 to 64. Researchers analyzed data from 637,557 bariatric surgeries from 2010 to 2017 in 11 states that extended Medicaid and 6 states that they did not.

Researchers, including Kristina Lewis Henderson, MD, associate professor of public health sciences at the Wake Forest School of Medicine, found that in the four years following the expansion (2014-2017), the use of the Weight loss surgery increased 31% each year among whites with Medicaid coverage or who were uninsured, but there was no significant change in weight loss surgeries among black and non-Hispanic people.

The study showed that prior to the ACA’s Medicaid expansion, lack of insurance may have been a major barrier for many low-income patients eligible for weight loss surgery. However, insurance alone, while a necessary step toward improving access to weight loss surgery, was not sufficient for the black and Hispanic patients in the study.

Hanchate said more research is needed to identify the reasons for this disparity. For these populations, there may be other barriers to weight loss surgery that still need to be removed, he said.

Future studies could examine, for example, whether low-income Hispanic and black patients are less likely to be referred by their primary care physicians for a surgical evaluation or more likely to be excluded during the pre-approval process.

“There are almost certainly other structural barriers facing minority patients, including ongoing racism and discrimination,” Hanchate said.


Mental Health and Economic Factors Influence Patient Pathways to Bariatric Surgery


More information:
Amresh D. Hanchate et al, Review of Elective Bariatric Surgery Rates Before and After Medicaid Expansion Under the U.S. Affordable Care Act, JAMA Health Forum (2021). DOI: 10.1001 / jamahealthforum.2021.3083

Provided by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center


Quote: Study Shows Expansion of Medicaid Increased Access to Bariatric Surgery for Obesity (2021, October 8) Retrieved October 8, 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-10 -medicaid-expansion-access-bariatric-surgery.html

This document is subject to copyright. Other than fair use for private study or research purposes, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.


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New Opdivo / Yervoy Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Begins Soon https://rhinoplastydigest.com/new-opdivo-yervoy-mesothelioma-clinical-trial-begins-soon/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 15:35:14 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/new-opdivo-yervoy-mesothelioma-clinical-trial-begins-soon/ Research and clinical trials Our fact-checking process begins with a thorough review of all sources to ensure they are of high quality. Then we crosscheck the facts with original medical or scientific reports published by those sources, or we validate the facts with reputable news organizations, medical and scientific experts, and other health experts. Each […]]]>

Research and clinical trials

Our fact-checking process begins with a thorough review of all sources to ensure they are of high quality. Then we crosscheck the facts with original medical or scientific reports published by those sources, or we validate the facts with reputable news organizations, medical and scientific experts, and other health experts. Each page includes all sources for total transparency.

A new clinical trial involving the immunotherapy combination of Opdivo and Yervoy will soon open in Chicago. The aim is to study the effectiveness of drugs when added to surgery for patients with peritoneal mesothelioma cancer.

The single-center phase II clinical trial follows a recent report detailing the impressive three-year efficacy of the drug combination when used for unresectable pleural mesothelioma.

Bristol Myers Squibb manufactures Opdivo and Yervoy, generically called nivolumab and ipilimumab. The United States Food and Drug Administration approved the association for pleural mesothelioma in 2020, making it the first new systemic treatment for mesothelioma in 15 years. Health organizations around the world, including those in Japan, China and the European Union, have issued similar first-line treatment approval.

This latest clinical trial is expected to include nearly 40 patients and last at least three years. It was approved in September and is scheduled to begin Jan. 1 at the University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center. Participation, including preoperative treatment, postoperative treatment and observation, will last for at least 18 months.

Researchers expand the use of immunotherapy

In the United States, approximately 1,000 people are diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma each year, which develops in the thin layer of tissue that lines the abdomen and often spreads throughout the abdominal cavity. Pleural mesothelioma develops in the tissues that line the lungs and chest cavity.

Although the pleural and peritoneal types of mesothelioma are molecularly and immunologically distinct, the growing success of the Opdivo / Yervoy combination with other cancers has led researchers to continue to expand its scope.

Opdivo and Yervoy are both known as checkpoint inhibitor drugs, but they work in different ways. When used with mesothelioma, they have shown an effective synergistic response with T cells, a type of white blood cell that is part of the immune system. Opdivo helps T cells discover the tumor, while Yervoy proliferates and activates T cells to kill tumor cells.

Peritoneal mesothelioma is most effectively treated today with a combination of cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, also known as CHIP. The hope is that adding immunotherapy will make it even better.

Although the Opdivo / Yervoy combination is not FDA approved for peritoneal mesothelioma, the MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas at Houston recently reported some success with off-label use of the treatment for patients with the disease. of inoperable disease.

Mesothelioma specialist talking with a patient and his wife

Connect with a best mesothelioma doctor

We’ve helped thousands of people affected by mesothelioma find the best treatments.

Study to focus on the effectiveness of surgery

The objective of the Opdivo / Yervoy clinical trial is to determine whether giving the combination of immunotherapies before surgery decreases tumor burden and whether it delays cancer regrowth if given after surgery. This will be the first time that Opdivo and Yervoy will be used with patients who have also undergone surgery and HIPEC.

The trial’s principal investigator and surgical oncologist, Dr Kiran Turaga, did not respond to requests from the Mesothelioma Center for additional information.

Three-year data from the latest clinical trial, named CheckMate 743, was presented at the European Society for Medical Oncology conference last month. It involved patients with inoperable pleural mesothelioma and compared those receiving the combination immunotherapy with those receiving standard chemotherapy.

CheckMate 743 Clinical Trial Results

Opdivo / Yervoy Chemotherapy
Three-year survival rate 23% 15%
Sustainable response rate over three years 28% 0%
Median response time 11.6 months 6.7 months
Median overall survival 18.1 months 14.1 months

“The results of the CheckMate 743 trial have changed the way doctors treat pleural mesothelioma,” said Dr Abderrahim Oukessou, Chest Cancer Development Manager for Bristol Myers Squibb. “We continue to see more evidence of the sustained survival benefits of dual immunotherapy on multiple tumors.”

The company said the Opdivo / Yervoy combination also showed significant improvement in survival in Phase III clinical trials in metastatic melanoma, non-small cell lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus and advanced renal cell carcinoma.

Connect with a mesothelioma doctor

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The Lupori family of Steamboat dedicate the funds of their deceased daughter to medical missions https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-lupori-family-of-steamboat-dedicate-the-funds-of-their-deceased-daughter-to-medical-missions/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 03:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-lupori-family-of-steamboat-dedicate-the-funds-of-their-deceased-daughter-to-medical-missions/ Sisters Caroline Lupori (left) and Ellese Lupori pose with a patient and family after surgery during a 2019 medical mission to central Mexico.John Lupori / Courtesy photo Caroline Lupori, from Steamboat Springs, was only 8 years old when she first accompanied her older sister and her doctor father on a medical mission to central Mexico […]]]>

Sisters Caroline Lupori (left) and Ellese Lupori pose with a patient and family after surgery during a 2019 medical mission to central Mexico.
John Lupori / Courtesy photo

Caroline Lupori, from Steamboat Springs, was only 8 years old when she first accompanied her older sister and her doctor father on a medical mission to central Mexico to help children with cleft lip and congenital malformations of the palate.

“She was amazed by the cleft palate disease and the way it affected the children, that they had difficulty eating and speaking,” said Dr John Lupori, the father of Caroline, an oral surgeon. and facial who retired from his local practice in 2018 but continues to practice. trauma surgeries at UCHealth Yampa Valley Medical Center.

Following Caroline’s death while ski touring in Montana last November, her family established the Caroline Mary Lupori Memorial Fund through the Yampa Valley Community Foundation to support causes and organizations important to Caroline. Still working on their grief, the family recently decided to dedicate the memorial fund to help local students interested in medicine join a missionary trip, such as surgical trips to Mexico. These experiences for high school students or above will begin in early 2022.



John has volunteered at a medical clinic based in Monterrey, Mexico called Clinica de Labio y Paladar Hendido for 20 years. The COVID-19 pandemic had halted travel since March 2020, but Lupori’s first post-pandemic trip to Cordoba, Mexico, is scheduled for November 13-20.

Caroline and her older sister, Ellese, who now attend Oregon Medical School, have been on mission trips half a dozen times over the years. The mission serves the indigenous population of the mountains of Mexico, south of Mexico City.



“Caroline helped give food and toys to the children, helped mothers with children before and after surgery, helped out at the clinic as an assistant with preparing supplies for the medical teams and helped with the photos, “her father recalls. “She believed that all of the people, including the doctors, in Mexico were the most dedicated people, and she was amazed at how these people contributed and came together to accomplish these missions.

“She had a better appreciation for what other people have to go through in the world and it felt good to be a part of it. I know she would like this to continue, ”he said.

Ellese, 23, said she remembers the smiles her younger sister brought to the patients she interacted with in Mexico.

“She had such a big heart for young children. She has always been like a child herself, literally and forever, ”said Ellese. “I think she made a lasting impression on them and their families beyond the medical aspect.”

The rate of cleft lip and palate in Mexico is more than double the rate in the United States, John said, and resources in Mexico for major surgeries are far fewer. The birth defect is caused by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors.

On some 35 mission trips over the years with other surgeons, John has helped repair birth defects for hundreds of infants and young children. He said the surgeries are technically challenging, challenging and rewarding because surgeons can repair patients’ birth defects and improve their lives immediately.

Longtime oral and facial surgeon Dr John Lupori in Steamboat Springs poses after surgery with local patient and surgeon Dr Teresa Coronado in 2019 during a medical mission to central Mexico.
Courtesy photo

According to the Mayo Clinic, cleft lip and cleft palate are openings or slits in the upper lip, the roof of the mouth, or both. Cleft lip and cleft palate occur when the facial structures that develop in an unborn baby do not close completely.

An adventurous athlete and artist, Caroline was in her second year of elementary school at Montana State University when she died in a backcountry skiing accident near Bozeman. Less than a month before Caroline’s death anniversary, her father said his family wanted to remember Caroline and thank the community.

Ellese, (L to R) John and Caroline Lupori from Steamboat Springs on a medical mission to Mexico in 2019.
Courtesy photo

“I would like people to know that our family is very grateful for all the support this community has given us throughout the years that we have lived here, for the great support during Caroline’s passing and the great support that they brought to his cause, ”John said.

People who would like to support the medical mission in Mexico can contribute to the private non-profit foundation Claypa-Los Cabos. Donations go directly to transportation, shelter, food and medical supplies needed by patients and their families.

Contributions to the Caroline Mary Lupori Memorial Fund to support local students interested in going on medical missions can be done through the Yampa Valley Community Foundation.


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The Richmond Observer – CON diet strikes again, rejecting proposed surgery center https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-richmond-observer-con-diet-strikes-again-rejecting-proposed-surgery-center/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 18:12:43 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-richmond-observer-con-diet-strikes-again-rejecting-proposed-surgery-center/ SANFORD – There are plenty of places to eat in your town. There’s no waiting to talk about it either. But the local restaurants just aren’t that appetizing. The food is really not good; the service, less than ideal. So when you crave a good meal out, you and many of your neighbors usually choose […]]]>

SANFORD – There are plenty of places to eat in your town. There’s no waiting to talk about it either. But the local restaurants just aren’t that appetizing. The food is really not good; the service, less than ideal. So when you crave a good meal out, you and many of your neighbors usually choose to drive across the county border to where the offerings are more to your liking. Updated menus, modern cuisines, excellent service, experience and recipes that hit the nail on the head.

A restaurateur in this neighboring county notices the number of customers who come from out of town. A commitment to service and an eye for opportunity gives the restaurateur an idea: to open another location to serve the market of hitherto itinerant customers where they live. You and your community are excited. Finally, a restaurant worthy of a date in your hometown. Soon you will no longer have to cross the county border.

Or so you thought.

A state government bureaucracy stepped in, denying the restaurant’s building permit and crushing your local umami dreams. As it turns out, all new restaurants must get approval from a government council that determines your community’s true dining needs, and they rejected approval for the potential new restaurant in your city, citing ” a surplus of dining options already available to consumers “. On the board are the owners of those same “dining options” that you carefully avoid whenever looking for a good meal. It looks like you’ll have to keep making this trip for a date.

Of course, that wouldn’t happen in the competitive retail restaurant market. Because, each Bojangles wins a competing Biscuitville; each Chic-Fil-A, a Popeyes. For you, that means plenty of high quality, competitively priced savory options to choose from in your local market. No long distance travel necessary.

This sort of thing regularly happens in the North Carolina health care market under current certificate of need laws. The CON law regulating health care resources in this state has, for decades, placed full authority over new or expanded health care resources – additional beds, new operating rooms, ambulatory care facilities, medical technology. imaging, state-of-the-art medical equipment – in the hands of designated people. bureaucrats, many of whom represent existing suppliers with whom new offerings would compete.

Currently, such a CON storyline is unfolding in Lee County, and it’s already a familiar story. Because it’s basically the same story from above, except that we replace “places to eat” with “places to have your bad knee surgery. “

The Surgical Clinic in Pinehurst, in neighboring Moore County, regularly serves Lee County residents who don’t find their local options for elective surgeries, like knee replacement, as appetizing as Moore’s. Pinehurst Surgical has applied for a Certificate of Necessity to build a new surgery center in Lee, offering all kinds of elective surgeries with the option of night time surveillance.

The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services denied the request. In issuing the denial, the DHHS cited an existing surplus of operating rooms in Lee County. Yet locals, patients, often avoid these same operating rooms, like those at Central Carolina Hospital, instead of alternatives, such as Pinehurst Surgical, in neighboring communities.

The negative effect reverberates far beyond healthcare, says Jim Womack, who served as Lee County Commissioner from 2010 to 2014.

“[Central Carolina Hospital’s] the reputation is horrible, and it is hurting economic growth and development in Lee County, ”Womack told the Carolina Journal. “There are a lot of people here who would like to see a new hospital or new options.

After a successful career in business with info-tech health systems, Womack says suboptimal health care is often a compromise for businesses looking for a location, families looking to relocate or retirees looking for recreation (and local health resources to keep them recreated on them).

Pinehurst Surgical’s application, if approved, would have enabled the type of facility that enhances these healthcare offerings. Since it was rejected, however, residents of Lee County can continue to travel, and all of those businesses, families and retirees can continue to drive.

“This result is the absurd result of North Carolina’s certificate of need laws,” said Brian Balfour, senior vice president of research for the John Locke Foundation. “At a time when lack of access to care is a growing concern, the CON Act allows state government officials to refuse the construction of medical care facilities that would allow access to patients in need. This is further proof of why North Carolina should abolish all of its CON laws. “

True to form, the bureaucracy that controls who should and should not be allowed to erect or expand health care facilities and resources in North Carolina does not necessarily do so consistently. One hundred miles east, Carteret Health Care requested a certificate of necessity to install a second linear accelerator, a very expensive piece of equipment regulated by the CON for the treatment of cancer, in 2022. In the eyes of the bureaucracy, the combined populations counties of Carteret and Craven – grouped together because of the small population – did not justify such a second accelerator. In this case, Carteret Health Care obtained an exemption and approval, after successfully arguing that it is difficult for cancer patients to drive out of town on a daily basis to be irradiated.

While Lee County residents traveling to the next county for shoulder surgery haven’t quite reached the “need” threshold, enough to accommodate a new surgery center, Carteret Health Care did. In particular, Carteret Health Care is a county hospital, which may be treated differently from groups of private physicians wishing to compete with hospitals by providing communities with better care options.

And why not? While competition can be good for consumers, it is not good for business, prompting hospitals and their industry associations to keep CON and Pinehurst Surgical laws out of Sanford. Exactly, says Balfour, why North Carolina should abolish these laws.

“A free healthcare market would allow local medical providers to decide what medical facilities are needed and where,” Balfour explains. “CON laws serve primarily to limit the supply of medical care, reducing patient options while increasing costs.”

Legal battles continue, although court rulings frustrate CON opponents.

On Tuesday, October 5, the North Carolina Court of Appeals dismissed an attempt to overturn a certificate of necessity decision in Wake County. The appeal judges refused to go beyond their authority to try to close a “loophole” in the CON.

The unanimous decision in Wake Radiology Diagnostic Imaging v. NC Department of Health and Human Services means loss for Wake Radiology. A competitor, the Bone and Joint Surgery Clinic, may retain a state government certificate allowing it to operate a magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, scan. Wake Radiology has taken legal action to block Bone and Joint’s CON. Wake Radiology had argued that Bone and Joint obtained its certificate without having to go through the standard CON process.


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New orthopedic surgeon to serve DeKalb County | The star https://rhinoplastydigest.com/new-orthopedic-surgeon-to-serve-dekalb-county-the-star/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/new-orthopedic-surgeon-to-serve-dekalb-county-the-star/ AUBURN – Local residents in need of orthopedic care now have the option of seeing an Ortho NorthEast specialist directly on the campus of Parkview DeKalb Hospital. Orthopedic surgeon William C. Geisert is now welcoming patients. “We are extremely fortunate that Dr. Geisert has chosen to practice at Parkview DeKalb Hospital,” said Tasha Eicher, President […]]]>

AUBURN – Local residents in need of orthopedic care now have the option of seeing an Ortho NorthEast specialist directly on the campus of Parkview DeKalb Hospital. Orthopedic surgeon William C. Geisert is now welcoming patients.

“We are extremely fortunate that Dr. Geisert has chosen to practice at Parkview DeKalb Hospital,” said Tasha Eicher, President of Parkview DeKalb Hospital. “His arrival helps us expand the orthopedic resources available near them to residents of DeKalb County. When injuries or orthopedic issues arise, it is so important to have access to excellent orthopedic doctors like Dr Geisert and his new colleagues at Ortho NorthEast.

Dr. Geisert is a general orthopedic surgeon who treats a wide variety of musculoskeletal problems in patients of all ages. As a surgeon, he specializes in the treatment of fractures and hip and knee replacement.

“The treatment of orthopedic problems is a team sport, and the surgeon, the medical team and the patient all have to work together to achieve the best results. I like to work closely with my patients to develop a treatment plan together and I want them to know that I am 100% behind them, ”said Geisert.

As a member of the medical staff at Parkview DeKalb Health, Geisert performs surgeries at DeKalb and sees patients at his on-site clinic.

He moved to Auburn from Somerset, Kentucky, where, as an orthopedic surgeon with Lake Cumberland Orthopedics, he served as chief of surgery at the Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital. He was also a member of the hospital’s clinical faculty for the family medicine and internal medicine residency programs.

Geisert received his medical degree from the University of Michigan School of Medicine, where he graduated with honors. During his residency, he trained in orthopedics at several Michigan hospitals, including the University of Michigan Health System, VA Hospital, and St. Joseph Mercy Hospital in Ann Arbor. His final phase of medical training took place at Michigan State University, McLaren Hospital / Hurley Medical Center in Flint, Michigan.

Geisert received a Bachelor of Science in Brain, Behavior and Cognition from the University of Michigan, with a minor in Biology.

“Originally, I was aiming for law school and a career in federal law enforcement; however, God led me on a different path, ”said Geisert.

After his first undergraduate studies, this path led him to the emergency services, and he gained significant experience as a senior paramedic with ambulance services in Ann Arbor and Mt. Pleasant, Michigan, while attending pre-med and medical school. He also volunteered for 11 years as a coach and medical staff for the Michigan Special Olympics.

Geisert is certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery. He is a member of the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society.

“The best part of my job is that I am able to care for a diverse patient population with a variety of musculoskeletal issues,” Geisert said. “Growing up, then working as a paramedic in a small town, I saw many injuries soon after they happened. I have always marveled at the recovery people would make after surgery, and wanted to be able to positively impact people’s lives in this way. While exploring orthopedics, I was equally (if not more) impressed with the improvements in quality of life after joint replacement surgery. That’s why I do what I do.

Outside of work, Geisert enjoys spending time with his family, golfing, boating, marksmanship, scuba diving and music. He plays guitar, bass and harmonica and is a Michigan Wolverines sports fan.


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At Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare, the Future of Healing is High Tech | Information Center https://rhinoplastydigest.com/at-stanford-health-care-valleycare-the-future-of-healing-is-high-tech-information-center/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 23:59:02 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/at-stanford-health-care-valleycare-the-future-of-healing-is-high-tech-information-center/ Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is committed to providing cutting edge patient care across East Bay. From robots that help with surgery and reduce recovery times to innovative devices that treat stubborn back pain associated with hernias, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare harnesses cutting-edge technology to bring the best care closer to home. Here is […]]]>

Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is committed to providing cutting edge patient care across East Bay.

From robots that help with surgery and reduce recovery times to innovative devices that treat stubborn back pain associated with hernias, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare harnesses cutting-edge technology to bring the best care closer to home.

Here is an overview of these and other new technologies that provide patients with high-quality orthopedic, cancer and cerebrovascular care, as well as an overview of the changes being made to the Ambulatory Surgery Center to expand and improve its services.

The da Vinci surgical system

Helped by the Da Vinci surgical system, surgeons can perform complex operations with only tiny incisions to minimize pain, bleeding, and recovery time. In one of the first surgeries to use the Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare system, doctors removed a woman’s uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes to treat her endometrial cancer.

The woman said she felt “pretty good” three days after the operation and was recovering “incredibly quickly”.

How it works: Two surgeons work in tandem during an operation: one controls a robotic arm to perform the operation, while the other stays at the patient’s bedside.

The first surgeon manipulates the arm, which is equipped with a small camera, surgical tools, and other delicate instruments. While the surgeon is working, the camera displays three-dimensional images of the surgical site on a monitor. The surgeon views these images to help guide the arm and tools to the surgical site and conduct the operation. The doctor at the bedside carefully observes the patient during the procedure.

“With the support of the ValleyCare Charitable Foundation, we were able to make this important investment to improve the care we provide to our community and provide our patients with faster recovery, less pain and a faster return to their daily activities.” , said Rick shumway, Stanford Health Care – President and CEO of ValleyCare.

Prevention and repair of rehernia

Over a decade ago Eugene Carragee, MD, professor of orthopedic surgery at Stanford Medicine, began researching why between 5% and 20% of patients who have had surgery to repair herniated spinal discs experienced painful recurrences of the disease.

A spinal hernia occurs when the soft internal tissue of a person’s intervertebral disc passes through the hard outer layer, pinching the nerves and causing pain. While the surgery, called a discectomy, is usually straightforward and successful, research by Carragee has shown that the likelihood of a rehernia is related to the size of the injury, or hole, created by the original hernia. Now, during a short surgery, doctors use a closure device to block the hole and prevent the hernias from coming back. Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is the first in California to use the device.

How it works: The device, called Barricaid, consists of a woven mesh attached to a titanium anchor that is implanted into the bone. The mesh blocks the opening created in the outer layer of the spinal cord, where the soft tissue had hollowed out and pinched the nerves.

Knee replacement robot

In January, the Food and Drug Administration approved a new robotic device that helps with complete knee replacements – delicate surgeries that can require a significant recovery time. The device allows physicians to customize the placement of knee replacement prostheses to suit each patient’s anatomy and reduce damage to surrounding soft tissue, thereby decreasing pain and potentially shortening recovery.

“It’s no longer one size fits all,” said Aaron Salyapongse, MD, clinical associate professor of orthopedics at Stanford Medicine and medical director of joint replacement at Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare. Doctors, nurses and surgical staff at the hospital are being trained in the use of the equipment, and the first surgery is expected to take place in early October.

How it works: During surgery, the table-mounted robotic device, called the VELYS robotic assistance solution, records a patient’s knee, continuously scans and sends images to a monitor so that the surgeon can analyze the position of the joint. The machine is equipped with a tool that allows physicians to accurately execute the personalized surgical plan.

“The goal is to provide the best possible surgery and knee replacement for each patient,” said Salyapongse. “With this device, we’ve added a whole new layer of data that gives us that capability.”

Advanced ambulatory care on the horizon

In spring 2022, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare will launch its Livermore outpatient surgery center under a new license, allowing advanced level outpatient procedures in a non-hospital setting. The change aims to streamline operations, specialize the services offered and improve outpatient care.

The outpatient surgery center operates on the Livermore campus of Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare.

Among other services, doctors at the center will perform orthopedic procedures, such as total hip and knee replacement surgery, as well as ophthalmological and gastrointestinal procedures, such as colonoscopies.

To support procedures that were previously only available in hospitals, Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare is improving sterile treatment in the outpatient setting and purchasing new operating room lamps, tables and surgical instruments.

“The license change to a stand-alone facility gives us the ability to expand the procedures available at Livermore and allows us to streamline operational and clinical efficiency,” said Kyle Wichelmann, CFO of Stanford Health Care – ValleyCare. “Ultimately, this helps provide better patient care at a more affordable cost. ”


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PeaceHealth Ketchikan Welcomes Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD to General Surgery Team https://rhinoplastydigest.com/peacehealth-ketchikan-welcomes-joshua-schkrohowsky-md-to-general-surgery-team/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 03:23:33 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/peacehealth-ketchikan-welcomes-joshua-schkrohowsky-md-to-general-surgery-team/ PeaceHealth Ketchikan Welcomes Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD to General Surgery Team 03 October 2021Sunday afternoon (SitNews) Ketchikan, Alaska – PeaceHealth Medical Group announced that Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD, has recently joined its orthopedic team. As an expert in arthroscopic knee and shoulder procedures, Dr. Schkrohowsky is expanding orthopedic treatment options in Ketchikan. Joshua Schkrohowsky, MDPhoto courtesy of […]]]>


PeaceHealth Ketchikan Welcomes Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD to General Surgery Team

03 October 2021
Sunday afternoon

(SitNews) Ketchikan, Alaska – PeaceHealth Medical Group announced that Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD, has recently joined its orthopedic team. As an expert in arthroscopic knee and shoulder procedures, Dr. Schkrohowsky is expanding orthopedic treatment options in Ketchikan.

jpg PeaceHealth Ketchikan Welcomes Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD to General Surgery Team

Joshua Schkrohowsky, MD
Photo courtesy of PHKMC

Dr Schkrohowsky joins PeaceHealth Ketchikan from Lake Chelan Community Hospitals and Clinics in Chelan, WA. Dr Schkrohowsky was educated at Johns Hopkins University and completed his residency at the University of Pittsburgh with a focus on sports medicine. He is familiar with Ketchikan, having served as a relief surgeon with PeaceHealth Ketchikan for the past year and has been licensed to Alaska since 2014. His areas of expertise include knee replacement and realignments, ACL repairs and reconstruction. and cartilage and carpal tunnel and trigger finger release. repairs.

Dr. Schkrohowsky offers conservative treatment for joint problems associated with injury or arthritis. Using a multidisciplinary approach, he works with a patient to reduce symptoms and restore function. When surgery is needed, he uses the latest minimally invasive procedures. “I believe in a multimodal, multidisciplinary approach to treating musculoskeletal injuries and pain – starting with the simplest, least invasive treatment. My goal is to treat each patient as if they were family, ”explained Dr Schkrohowsky.

Dr Schkrohowsky is joined in Ketchikan by his wife, Cynthia Lochhead, and their four children. They collectively enjoy reading, going out, traveling, and being active in general. The family is drawn to Ketchikan by “the pleasant atmosphere and the good community atmosphere,” explained Dr. Schkrohowsky.

Dr. Schkrohowsky joins orthopedic surgeon Steven Becker, MD, and assistant physician Daniel Schlecht to complete Ketchikan’s orthopedics and sports medicine team and bring additional expertise to our island.

As the orthopedic team grows, PeaceHealth Ketchikan is also informed that PeaceHealth Ketchikan is officially part of the Premera Knee & Hip Blue Distinction program. Many PeaceHealth orthopedic surgeries are now covered locally by Premera BlueCross BlueShield, allowing more of our community to stay on site for treatment.

Edited by Mary Kauffman, SitNews

News source:

PeaceHealth Ketchikan Medical Center
www.peacehealth.org/ketchikan

About: PeaceHealth, based in Vancouver, Washington, is a not-for-profit Catholic health care system providing care to communities in Washington, Oregon and Alaska. PeaceHealth has approximately 16,000 caregivers, a group practice with over 1,100 providers and 10 medical centers serving urban and rural communities in the Northwest. In 1890, the Sisters of Saint-Joseph de la Paix founded what has become PeaceHealth. The sisters shared their expertise and transferred their wisdom from one medical center to another, always finding the best way to address unmet health care needs in their communities. Today, PeaceHealth is the legacy of the founding sisters and continues with a spirit of respect, stewardship, collaboration and social justice in the accomplishment of its mission.

The representations of facts and opinions in the published comments are only those of the individual posters and do not represent the opinions of Sitnews.

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INTEGRIS Santé Edmond celebrates its 10th anniversary https://rhinoplastydigest.com/integris-sante-edmond-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary/ Sat, 02 Oct 2021 15:00:45 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/integris-sante-edmond-celebrates-its-10th-anniversary/ INTEGRIS Health Edmond will celebrate its tenth anniversary on October 3, 2021. There have been many accomplishments over the past decade as the hospital has grown to meet the changing needs of the Edmond community. State-of-the-art, full-service, $ 94 million hospital opens October 3, 2011 A $ 2.25 million cardiology and interventional radiology suite was […]]]>

INTEGRIS Health Edmond will celebrate its tenth anniversary on October 3, 2021. There have been many accomplishments over the past decade as the hospital has grown to meet the changing needs of the Edmond community.

  • State-of-the-art, full-service, $ 94 million hospital opens October 3, 2011
  • A $ 2.25 million cardiology and interventional radiology suite was added in 2013.
  • Construction of a second medical office building begins in 2014. The additional $ 12.5 million, 45,000 square foot facility opens in 2015.
  • The Arcadia Trails INTEGRIS Center for Addiction Recovery will open on May 28, 2019. The 60,000 square foot facility includes a treatment area, conference center and 40 bed living space.
  • A $ 95 million expansion project is completed in 2021. The once 40-bed, 143,000-square-foot hospital has now doubled in size to 104 beds and just over 300,000 square feet.
  • The hospital originally employed 150 caregivers, today it has nearly 450.

To date, the hospital has recorded approximately 23,000 admissions, more than 30,000 surgeries, more than 170,000 emergency room visits, delivered approximately 6,000 babies and treated approximately 500 COVID-19 patients.

“We are thrilled to be celebrating our 10th anniversary with our caregivers and this community,” said Jon Rule, CEO of the hospital. “Over 10 years ago, our Board of Directors, community partners and caregivers decided to provide exceptional healthcare to Edmond. In the 10 years of our existence, and more recently with the heroic response of our caregivers and providers to the pandemic, I believe we have accomplished what we set out to do and now we are looking to the future. ”

Angie Kamermayer is the head nurse at the hospital. “Nursing at INTEGRIS Santé Edmond has created a reputation for quality and compassion that our community has come to know and trust. Our nurses embody kindness, courtesy and respect from beginning to end of life. Everyone is a hero, leaving a strong impression on the lives of our patients, families and healthcare team. I am proud of who we have become and the importance of our presence in the community.

INTEGRIS Health Edmond offers a comprehensive list of inpatient and outpatient services including: emergency medicine, surgery, cardiac catheterization and radiology lab, labor and delivery, primary care, Jim Thorpe rehabilitation, wound care and more.

“INTEGRIS Health Edmond has launched a health care boom for the Edmond community and provides top-notch comprehensive health care not only to Edmond but to surrounding communities,” said Keith Gannaway, MD, Chief of Surgery of the hospital. A resident of Edmond for 33 years, I believe the health care in Edmond has been raised to a standard that any community would be proud and honored to have. “

Dena O’Leary, MD, is the Chief Medical Officer. She fully agrees: “INTEGRIS Health Edmond is a hospital that I am incredibly proud to be a part of. Although we have experienced tremendous growth over the past few years, we continue to focus on providing quality care to our patients while maintaining a warm and friendly culture with close ties to our community. I can’t wait to see what the next 10 years have in store for us.

Baby RysonTo put the lifespan of the hospital in perspective, here are side-by-side images of the first baby born in the hospital.

Ryson Wilson was born on October 4, 2011. Today, he is nine years old and in grade 4 at Central Elementary School in Guthrie. The natural born athlete is already 5 feet tall and weighs 115 pounds. As he looks forward to his tenth birthday, it reminds us that his life has only just begun, and like the hospital itself, we know that many great things are on the horizon and we can’t wait to see what the future holds.


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