Medical surgery – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 19:11:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-08T154233.528.png Medical surgery – Rhinoplasty Digest http://rhinoplastydigest.com/ 32 32 Orthopedic Spine Surgeon Dr. Sonny Gill Joins Steadman Clinic Surgical Team https://rhinoplastydigest.com/orthopedic-spine-surgeon-dr-sonny-gill-joins-steadman-clinic-surgical-team/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 18:22:18 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/orthopedic-spine-surgeon-dr-sonny-gill-joins-steadman-clinic-surgical-team/ The former Steadman Clinic and Steadman Philippon Research Institute fellow, specializing in complex, minimally invasive spine surgery, starts in Vail on Nov. 28. VAIL, Colo., Nov. 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Orthopedic spine surgeon Sonny Gill, MD, joins the surgical team at Steadman Clinic on November 28, 2022. Dr. Gill comes to Vail after a […]]]>

The former Steadman Clinic and Steadman Philippon Research Institute fellow, specializing in complex, minimally invasive spine surgery, starts in Vail on Nov. 28.

VAIL, Colo., Nov. 21, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Orthopedic spine surgeon Sonny Gill, MD, joins the surgical team at Steadman Clinic on November 28, 2022. Dr. Gill comes to Vail after a successful decade with the Carolinas Medical Group in Greer/Greenville, SC, y including building a Spine Center of Excellence that has won Healthgrades five-star award eight years in a row and US News and World Report recognition of excellence in spinal fusion surgery.

Dr. Gill specializes in complex, minimally invasive spine surgery of the neck and back, including sports injuries of the spine using motion preservation techniques. His appointment to the Steadman Clinic marks a return to the Vail Valley for Dr. Gill, who was a member of the Steadman Clinic and the Steadman Philippon Research Institute (SPRI) from 2004 to 2005 and also worked with the clinic. from 2008 to 2010.

“I was very lucky,” said Dr. Gill. “I worked with Dr (J. Richard) Steadman and Dr (Marc) Philippon during my internship. Dr Philippon had just arrived so he always jokes that I was his first mate in Vail. Learning with these two mentors and the other great surgeons at Steadman Clinic has been such a blessing.

“We are so privileged to have Dr. Gill join our staff,” said Dr. Philippon, Managing Partner of the Steadman Clinic and President of the Steadman Philippon Research Institute (SPRI). “He is one of our nation’s elite spine surgeons and will have an immediate impact on our surgical team here at Steadman Clinic.”

Dr. Gill is a graduate of Boston University School of Medicine’s Accelerated Combined Bachelor’s/Medicine Program. He completed his residency in Orthopedic Surgery at the University of Virginia School of Medicine. Prior to completing his Sports Medicine Fellowship at the Steadman Clinic and SPRI in 2005, Dr. Gill was a Spine Surgery Fellow and Clinical Instructor at Emory University in Atlanta from 2003-2004.

Like so many of his new colleagues at the Steadman Clinic, Dr. Gill has extensive experience working with sports teams. During his internship at the Steadman Clinic and SPRI, he was involved in the care of the Denver Broncos of the NFL and the Colorado Rockies of the MLB. He was chief medical officer for the US Adaptive Ski Team from 2008-2010 and currently provides medical coverage for the US Olympic Ski Team. He also took care of the Ford Ironman World Triathlon Championships in Kona, Hawaii, the United States Professional Cycling Championships, the Greenville Drive Minor League Baseball Team, and the Pro Football Team. of Greenville Triumph in South Carolina.

In addition to joining the world-class team of surgeons at the Steadman Clinic, Dr. Gill also looks forward to working side-by-side in SPRI’s labs with Dr. Johnny Huard and the team of highly trained scientists and researchers. appreciated by SPRI.

“Research is one of my passions,” noted Dr. Gill. “We did important research on disc regeneration and stem cells at Clemson University, where I worked in the bioengineering department. Our group won the North American Spine Society grant for our research a few years ago. It has truly been a lifelong goal for me to understand the science behind disc degeneration and to combat the degenerative cascade in the disc. Working with Dr. Huard and other researchers in regenerative medicine gives me the opportunity to be part of the future of medicine, especially because Dr. Huard and his team are leaders in the anti-aging aspect of cellular senescence of medicine and tissue use. engineering for new technologies.

Dr. Gill begins his new role at Vail the week after Thanksgiving and is grateful to be part of the Steadman team.

“I think, unequivocally, they’re striving to be the best,” Dr. Gill said. “They are always striving to be better, both clinically and surgically. They search at the top of their domains. My goal is always to be at that level where my caliber matches their caliber. ”

During his internship at The Steadman Clinic and SPRI, the impression Dr. Steadman left on Dr. Gill was both overwhelming and lasting.

“I think all of us who have had the opportunity to learn from Dr. Steadman will agree with that. Dr. Steadman didn’t just teach us to be surgeons. More importantly, he taught us to care for people with compassion and empathy. Patients came to the clinic with great fear, significant worry, palpable anxiety, and many misconceptions about the spectrum of surgery as a treatment. “Steady” taught us all how to help them through this stressful process. He just had a way of letting patients know he was aware of their concern. He knew their concern. He knew what they wanted to do to return to their normal lives, whether as a grandfather pursuing his grandchildren or as an elite footballer whose career depended on his sporting prowess. It was just awesome to be part of this program and now to be part of the Steadman clinic and the Steadman philosophy again.

“It’s been a really endearing process to be part of this family for so long,” Dr. Gill continued. “I have a lot of patients here (in South Carolina) who send me off with really heartfelt words and I’m so grateful to them. For the past 11 or 12 years this place has shaped me, but Vail has my heart and The Steadman Clinic is my soul.

For more information, contact Lynda Sampson, Vice President of External Affairs at SPRI (lsampson@sprivail.org).

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Local student creates ‘pink operating chairs’ to help breast cancer surgery patients https://rhinoplastydigest.com/local-student-creates-pink-operating-chairs-to-help-breast-cancer-surgery-patients/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 07:15:48 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/local-student-creates-pink-operating-chairs-to-help-breast-cancer-surgery-patients/ Complimentary recliners are loaned to breast cancer surgery patients at Williamson Medical Center (WMC) to help them recover comfortably. Operation Pink Chairs — started by Williamson County student Olivia Bratcher and inspired by her mother’s journey with breast cancer — benefits from a partnership between the WMC Foundation and Franklin-based Head Springs Depot. After her […]]]>

Complimentary recliners are loaned to breast cancer surgery patients at Williamson Medical Center (WMC) to help them recover comfortably. Operation Pink Chairs — started by Williamson County student Olivia Bratcher and inspired by her mother’s journey with breast cancer — benefits from a partnership between the WMC Foundation and Franklin-based Head Springs Depot.

After her mother Amy’s breast cancer treatment at WMC, Bratcher pitched her idea to the hospital’s charitable arm, the WMC Foundation. Its board of directors immediately agreed to support the Pink Chairs operation and to recruit volunteers from the hospital to organize the process.

“Olivia is a true connector and has such a heart for helping women like her mother,” said Leigh Williams, WMC Foundation Director of Development. “Our Foundation is thrilled to partner with Head Springs Depot to support and help grow this incredible project on behalf of Olivia and our patients undergoing breast cancer treatments.”

Five recliners were funded by the WMC Foundation. The chairs were purchased from Head Springs Depot, who will store, deliver, pick them up and also prepare them for the next patient in need. Each chair is named after a breast cancer patient. A recliner can be loaned to a patient undergoing breast cancer surgery for six weeks, an average recovery period from surgery.

“Olivia is a dynamic and passionate young woman and when she pitched the idea to me, I knew I wanted to help,” said Seth Hall, owner of Head Springs Depot.

Head Springs Depot contracted the high-quality American manufacturers who built the first set of recliners made available to breast cancer patients at Williamson Medical Center.

“It’s an honor to work alongside Williamson Medical Center to bring Olivia’s idea to fruition,” Hall added. “We look forward to helping this program grow to help more people in our community who are recovering from this disease.”

Additional chairs will be purchased with donations to the WMC Foundation. Bratcher’s vision is to provide more equipment such as lift chairs and adjustable beds to help patients recover from breast cancer and other cancers.

Bratcher witnessed her mother’s journey through breast cancer and her recovery, when a friend and breast cancer patient offered a recliner. This special chair, which was ultimately shared among 12 women who had all received breast cancer treatment and surgeries, was the inspiration for Operation Pink Chairs. The sustainable project also earned Olivia the Gold Award, Girl Scouting’s most prestigious award. Recipients are honored for developing and implementing sustainable solutions to local issues.

“I wanted to do something to help people have the same relaxing experience my mom had during this difficult time,” Bratcher said. “The chairs represent a legacy of love and hope as they travel from house to house, empowering women to heal physically and emotionally.”

Donate to Operation Pink Chairs or learn more at www.williamsonmedicalcenter.org/operation-pink-chairs.

ABOUT THE WILLIAMSON MEDICAL CENTER – Williamson Medical Center offers comprehensive inpatient and outpatient services, 24-hour emergency care, preventive health screenings, and wellness activities. The services offered by Williamson Medical Center are developed to provide the most cost-effective, convenient, and accessible health care possible. More than 825 providers represent more than 70 medical specialties and subspecialties. The caliber of physicians and care at Williamson Medical Center continues to advance the way health care is delivered in our region with a compassion and convenience unique to WMC. Our campus also houses Monroe Carell Jr. Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital at Williamson Medical Centerthat provides urgent and inpatient pediatric care, and Tennessee Bone and Joint Institute – the region’s leading destination for orthopedic excellence. In addition, WMCs Williamson Medical Group includes more than 40 providers offering everything from primary care and surgery to pulmonary and sleep medicine. For more information, visit WilliamsonMedicalCenter.org.

ABOUT THE WILLIAMSON MEDICAL CENTER FOUNDATION – The Williamson Medical Center Foundation, Inc., serves as the charitable and developmental arm that supports Williamson Medical Center, Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital Vanderbilt at Williamson Medical Center and Bone and Joint Institute of Tennessee in providing the finest in healthcare of their family services category in our community. The Foundation oversees capital projects and health awareness programs, seeking charitable donations of all types to provide ways to continually improve the quality of patient care. For more information, visit www.williamsonmedicalcenter.org/foundation-home.

ABOUT HEAD SPRINGS DEPOT – Founded in 2010, Head Springs Depot is a family owned business focused on providing high quality, stylish products to customers at the best possible price. The company works directly with manufacturers to provide mattresses, hardwood furniture, home decor and more.

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The MDSPCA seeks to purchase an X-ray machine through donations https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-mdspca-seeks-to-purchase-an-x-ray-machine-through-donations/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 22:06:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/the-mdspca-seeks-to-purchase-an-x-ray-machine-through-donations/ DONATIONS OF THE YEAR WILL HELP WITH A MUCH NEEDED X-RAY SHINE. — X-RAY MACHINE. >> SO MY HAT IS PUMPKIN SPICE BECAUSE I AM SPICY AND HERE WE HAVE IT ALL GOOD. >> IT WAS LOVE ON THE FIRST SITE WHEN BRITTANY-LEE ADOPTED HER FURRY DAUGHTER FROM THE MARYLAND SPCA. >> WHO IS MY […]]]>

DONATIONS OF THE YEAR WILL HELP WITH A MUCH NEEDED X-RAY SHINE. — X-RAY MACHINE. >> SO MY HAT IS PUMPKIN SPICE BECAUSE I AM SPICY AND HERE WE HAVE IT ALL GOOD. >> IT WAS LOVE ON THE FIRST SITE WHEN BRITTANY-LEE ADOPTED HER FURRY DAUGHTER FROM THE MARYLAND SPCA. >> WHO IS MY DAUGHTER. >> AND KELPIE HAS THE WHOLE SURVIVAL STORY. SHE WAS FOUND ON MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND EVENING IN THE PARKING LOT OF A RESTAURANT, IN LABOR AND IN DISTRESS. STAFF WHO HAD ALREADY GONE HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS TURNED TO HELP. >> OUR TEAM WAS JUST AMAZING, THEY TOOK ACTION. WE GOT X-RAYS ON THE STREET AT OUR CLINIC AND IT SHOWN THAT WE HAVE A LOT OF PUPPIES THAT NEED TO GO OUT. WE DID AN EMERGENCY C-SECTION. KENNEL TECHNICIANS WHO HAVE BEEN HERE FOR YEARS WHO HAVE NEVER SEEN SURGERY HAVE COME AND SAW ONE AND ARE ACTUALLY HELPING TO REVIVE THE PUPPIES, IT WAS TRULY A MIRACLE. >> ESPECIALLY SINCE GETTING THESE X-RAYS CAN TAKE 5 TO 15 MINUTES. AND SO THIS GIVEN TUESDAY, THE SPCA OF MARYLAND HOPE TO Raise $75,000 TO PURCHASE AN X-RAY MACHINE TO HAVE ON-SITE. >> THE TRUTH IS THAT IN AN EMERGENCY, THE FASTER WE CAN PROVIDE THE NECESSARY CARE AND SERVICES AND GET THE INFORMATION WE NEED. WE CAN SAVE MORE LIVES. >> LIVE AS KELPIE, WHO BRITTANY LEE NOW CALLS SARAH AND HER ADOPTED PUPPIES. >> I DID NOT KNOW AT THE TIME THAT IT WAS GOING TO BE MINE BUT WITHOUT THEM I WOULD NEVER HAVE GOT IT. IN THIS MOMENT, I COULDN’T IMAGINE MY LIFE WITHOUT HER, SO I CAN’T IMAGINE WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF THEY DIDN’T SAVE HER. AND THEN, I REALLY THANK THEM VERY MUCH. >> AN ANONYMOUS DONOR AGREED TO PLAY UP TO $40,000 TO MAKE EVERY DOLLAR YOU DONATE REALLY COUNT. TO FIND OUT MORE, LOG ON TO OUR WEBSITE

SPCA hopes ‘Giving Tuesday’ donations will help buy much-needed medical equipment

The Maryland SPCA hopes “Giving Tuesday” donations will help them buy a much-needed X-ray machine. It was love at first sight when Brittany-Lee Smith adopted her furry daughter from the Maryland SPCA. Her dog, Kelpie, has quite a story of survival after being found over Memorial Day weekend in a restaurant parking lot, laboring and in distress. Staff who had already been home for the holidays turned around to help. “Our team was just amazing. They sprang into action. We had street x-rays at our clinic, and it showed we had a lot of puppies that needed to be done. We did an emergency c-section,” said Nichole Miller, director of pet care at the shelter, “Kennel techs who have been here for years (and) who have never seen an operation have come in and seen one and actually helped to revive the puppies. So, it was truly a miracle.” It was a miracle, especially because getting to the X-ray image can take anywhere from five to 15 minutes. And so, this “Giving Tuesday,” the MDSPCA hopes to raise $75,000 to buy an x-ray machine to have on hand.” The truth is, in an emergency, the faster we can provide the care and service we can and get the information we need, we can save more lives,” Miller said. Saving more lives like Kelpie, whom Lee now calls Sarah, and her adopted puppies. “I didn’t know at the time that she was going to be mine, but without them I never would have had her. I couldn’t imagine my life without her. So I can’t imagine what would have happened if they hadn’t saved her. , and so I really thank them very much,” Smith said. An anonymous donor has agreed to donate up to $40,000, so every dollar donated really matters. To find out more, visit this site.

The Maryland SPCA hopes “Giving Tuesday” donations will help them buy a much-needed X-ray machine.

It was love at first sight when Brittany-Lee Smith adopted her furry daughter from the Maryland SPCA. Her dog, Kelpie, has quite a story of survival after being found over Memorial Day weekend in a restaurant parking lot, laboring and in distress. Staff who had already gone home for the holidays turned around to help.

“Our team was just amazing. They sprang into action. We had street x-rays at our clinic, and it showed we had a lot of puppies that needed to be released. We did an emergency caesarean “, said Nichole. Miller, the director of pet care at the shelter. “Kennel techs who have been here for years (and) never seen an operation came in and saw one and actually helped revive the puppies. So it was truly a miracle. “

It was a miracle, especially because getting the x-ray image can take anywhere from five to 15 minutes. And so, this “Giving Tuesday,” the MDSPCA hopes to raise $75,000 to buy an X-ray machine to have on site.

“The truth is, in an emergency, the faster we can provide the care and services we need and get the information we need, the more lives we can save,” Miller said.

Saving more lives like Kelpie, whom Lee now calls Sarah, and her adopted puppies.

“I didn’t know at the time that she was going to be mine, but, without them, I could never have had her. I couldn’t imagine my life without her. So, I can’t imagine what would have happened if they didn’t save her, and so I really thank them so much,” Smith said.

An anonymous donor has agreed to donate up to $40,000, so every dollar donated really matters. To find out more, visit this website.

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BC surgeons volunteer in Poland to help injured war victims in Ukraine https://rhinoplastydigest.com/bc-surgeons-volunteer-in-poland-to-help-injured-war-victims-in-ukraine/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 22:12:08 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/bc-surgeons-volunteer-in-poland-to-help-injured-war-victims-in-ukraine/ new westminster surgeon Dr. Kimit Rai recently returned from a volunteer mission in Poland. Rai traveled to Poland with the Canada-Ukraine Foundation to perform reconstructive surgery on people injured in the ongoing conflict in Ukraine. Read more: Ukrainian troops enter Kherson and meet with joy as Russia abandons the city The surgeon has a vast […]]]>

new westminster surgeon Dr. Kimit Rai recently returned from a volunteer mission in Poland.

Rai traveled to Poland with the Canada-Ukraine Foundation to perform reconstructive surgery on people injured in the ongoing conflict in Ukraine.

Read more:

Ukrainian troops enter Kherson and meet with joy as Russia abandons the city

The surgeon has a vast wealth of knowledge and work experience as he has operated on over 3,000 patients in 25 years, specializing in cleft palates and facial deformities.

“Major reconstructive surgeries were performed,” Rai said.

“There were gunshot wounds and a lot of refugees from many different places.”

Rai has joined a specialist team of doctors, nurses and medical support staff who are helping to rebuild the faces, limbs and lives of patients working in Poland.

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“Patients could not be treated adequately in Ukraine,” said Dr. Oleh Antonyshyn, of the Canada-Ukraine Surgical Assistance Program.

“It’s a medical system targeted by Russia with more than 100 hospitals destroyed. The medical system (in Ukraine) is overwhelmed.

Read more:

On the back road to Ukraine, bodies of children and the wreckage of a civilian convoy shelled by the Russians

The Canada-Ukraine Surgical Assistance Program has a long heritage in this now war-torn country. The two doctors first came to Kyiv in 2014 to help patients.

But when the Russian invasion began, it was deemed too dangerous to bring in the team of Canadian volunteers.

Work then began to find a hospital in Poland near the border where patients could be treated and return home to Ukraine.

“When these patients arrive in Poland, they have become friends, they have become family,” said Julia Krekhovetsky-Malaniy of the Canada Ukraine Foundation.

“That’s why we keep doing the work.”

Read more:

Russian withdrawal from Kherson will take days, Kyiv says as Ukraine retakes towns

Looking ahead, Dr. Rai is currently working on a plan to establish a children’s surgery center in Ukraine, which could be supported by Operation Rainbow Canada, a voluntary non-profit organization that helps children in need.

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BC doctor raises funds for medical equipment in Ukraine


© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Tower Health Appoints Eugene Reilly, MD, Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer https://rhinoplastydigest.com/tower-health-appoints-eugene-reilly-md-vice-president-chief-medical-information-officer/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 10:38:37 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/tower-health-appoints-eugene-reilly-md-vice-president-chief-medical-information-officer/ Eugene F. Reilly, MD, FACS, MHCI, CPE Tower Health announced that Eugene F. Reilly, MD, FACS, MHCI, CPE has been named Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer (CMIO). In this role, Dr. Reilly will work closely with clinical and technology leaders in the healthcare system to ensure alignment of health information technology (health IT) with […]]]>

Eugene F. Reilly, MD, FACS, MHCI, CPE

Tower Health announced that Eugene F. Reilly, MD, FACS, MHCI, CPE has been named Vice President, Chief Medical Information Officer (CMIO). In this role, Dr. Reilly will work closely with clinical and technology leaders in the healthcare system to ensure alignment of health information technology (health IT) with strategic, clinical and operational goals. . He will also continue as Associate Medical Director of the Trauma Program and Director of the Surgical Critical Care Fellowship at Reading Hospital.

Dr Reilly joined the trauma team at Reading Hospital in 2007 as a surgeon and surgical intensivist. Since then, in addition to maintaining his clinical practice, he has assumed leadership roles in trauma, postgraduate medical education and clinical informatics. He is a longtime champion for clinicians in health informatics, serving as a subject matter expert for Epic during its implementation at Reading Hospital in 2012 and chairing the highest level IT governance committees. since 2018. He has developed the health informatics infrastructure that has helped facilitate Reading Hospital Trauma Center accreditation through three consecutive surveys, and has presented his research on health informatics and other topics to United States and abroad. He is certified as a Physician Builder by Epic Systems, Inc., and has been Chair of Epic’s Trauma Specialty Steering Committee since its inception in 2017.

Dr. Reilly completed his fellowship in trauma surgery and surgical intensive care at the University of Pennsylvania Hospital, and his residency in general surgery at Abington Memorial Hospital. He holds an MD from Jefferson Medical College, an MS in Healthcare Innovation from the University of Pennsylvania, and a BS in Chemistry and Biology from West Chester University in Pennsylvania. He is board certified in surgery and surgical intensive care by the American Board of Surgery, in neurocritical care by the American Board of Anesthesiology, and in clinical informatics by the American Board of Preventative Medicine. He recently completed his cornerstone as an Executive Physician certified by the American Association for Physician Leadership. Dr. Reilly is appointed Associate Professor of Surgery at Drexel University College of Medicine, Associate Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, and Adjunct Associate Professor of Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

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Spalding GP Surgery’s 3,000 patients will be moved to Gosberton Medical Center books https://rhinoplastydigest.com/spalding-gp-surgerys-3000-patients-will-be-moved-to-gosberton-medical-center-books/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/spalding-gp-surgerys-3000-patients-will-be-moved-to-gosberton-medical-center-books/ Health bosses today confirmed that patients enrolled at Spalding GP Surgery will be transferred to registries at Gosberton Medical Center. NHS Lincolnshire Integrated Care Board (ICB), the body responsible for sorting out the provision of healthcare services in our region, announced the decision today after much speculation about the future of patients based at Johnson […]]]>

Health bosses today confirmed that patients enrolled at Spalding GP Surgery will be transferred to registries at Gosberton Medical Center.

NHS Lincolnshire Integrated Care Board (ICB), the body responsible for sorting out the provision of healthcare services in our region, announced the decision today after much speculation about the future of patients based at Johnson Hospital.

The deal could mean patients can continue to get services from the hospital’s current site.

Sarah-Jane Mills, Director of ICB, said, “We are very pleased with the outcome and look forward to working alongside the staff at Gosberton Medical Center to ensure the smooth transition of patients from Spalding GP Surgery.

Gosberton Medical Center has taken care of patients – and may be able to offer services at Johnson Hospital (Image: Google) (60445684)

“We have been very impressed with the discussions with Gosberton Medical Center, the assurances they have given us and their ambitions for the future.”

Ms Mills added: “We would like to thank the patients of Spalding GP Surgery for their patience during this process and for all the feedback we have received which has helped us achieve what we believe will be a good outcome for all. given the circumstances.”

Low Gate-based Gosberton Medical Center is currently caring for over 7,500 patients and is rated as good by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Bosses say its survey of GP patients showed 91% of patients describe their overall experience as good.

In a statement, GP Partners of Gosberton said: “We are delighted to have had this opportunity to work with the ICB and we look forward to welcoming new patients in the weeks to come.”

The GP Partners added: “This is part of our long-term plans and will help us continue to develop services that meet the needs of our patients now and in the future.”

Gosberton Medical Center is interested in developing plans with the ICB, including the potential provision of services at Johnson Community Hospital.

Current Spalding GP Surgery patients are told to continue to enter the practice as normal.

They were promised further details in writing to officially confirm the changes.



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Smart medicine makes rehabilitation and surgery easier and more efficient https://rhinoplastydigest.com/smart-medicine-makes-rehabilitation-and-surgery-easier-and-more-efficient/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/smart-medicine-makes-rehabilitation-and-surgery-easier-and-more-efficient/ Editor’s note: Smart medicine is the future of medicine. Information technology, artificial intelligence and big data are becoming increasingly important in healthcare, which is evolving to be more human-centric and practical. This series, which covers various aspects of the field of health, aims to demonstrate what high technology, intelligent systems and inventions are capable of. […]]]>

Editor’s note:

Smart medicine is the future of medicine. Information technology, artificial intelligence and big data are becoming increasingly important in healthcare, which is evolving to be more human-centric and practical. This series, which covers various aspects of the field of health, aims to demonstrate what high technology, intelligent systems and inventions are capable of.

Shot by Jiang Xiaowei. Edited by Sun Chao. Subtitles by Sun Chao.

What’s your schedule an hour before you go to bed?

This question may resonate more with people who suffer from bone and muscle problems or who have had orthopedic surgery.

A good choice for them would be to open a health app, put sensors on the body, and watch videos of therapists performing rehabilitation exercises for a sore back, neck, legs and arms after a long-term work or positions that suffer from sports injuries or parts that have received orthopedic surgery.

Smart medicine now allows people to do rehabilitation at home and that too under the supervision and guidance of professional orthopedists and therapists.

“About 95% of patients who visit orthopedic departments do not need surgery. So doctors usually prescribe medication and give some advice. Without proper rehabilitation, these people come back for medication or consultations with doctors. weeks or months later,” said Dr. Lu Yiming, chief medical officer. of the Shanghai Medmotion Rehabilitation Clinic.

“After surgery, patients are usually given a piece of paper requiring them to do rehabilitation after they go home. But there are no details on how to do rehabilitation, how often and how hard.

“Every orthopedic surgeon stresses the importance of rehabilitation, which can account for half of the positive effects of surgery. But the shortage of therapists, low public awareness and the COVID-19 pandemic have had a negative impact on the need for regular patient care and good rehabilitation.”

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

Sensors are placed on the body to monitor rehabilitation.

There are 30 to 70 rehabilitation therapists per 100,000 people in developed countries. But the figure is only 2.6 therapists per 100,000 Chinese, with shortages severely limiting the number of patients who can benefit from the service. Additionally, the majority of therapists are located in large cities, which means that patients in rural areas or small towns do not have access to professional rehabilitation advice.

“Getting to a hospital or clinic also takes time and means going through traffic or restrictions, like during the pandemic,” he added.

Smart medicine with technologies like AI and big data is the answer, suggested Lu, whose clinic just received approval from the National Medical Products Administration, or China’s FDA, on new rehabilitation equipment. digital, which allows patients to follow rehabilitation at home under the guidance of professionals.

“After putting all the personal information and medical record into the system, our therapists and orthopedists provide online consultation, then the AI ​​system makes a rehabilitation plan, which is reviewed by the doctor. A trial confirmed that the plans made by the AI ​​system are 95% similar to those made by experts from major public hospitals,” Lu revealed.

“The information collected from the system will ultimately benefit clinical practice, improve AI capability, and offer more information and data to physicians.”

The system will then suggest videos appropriate to the patient’s condition, choosing from the approximately 200 videos in the database. All demonstrations in the videos are done by professional therapists.

Smart medicine makes rehabilitation and surgery easier and more efficient

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

Smart medicine makes rehabilitation more convenient.

Smart medicine makes rehabilitation and surgery easier and more efficient

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

A patient’s bones and muscles are displayed on the screen.

“With sensors installed on different parts of the body, the system can monitor every gesture of the patient. When the movement is not accurate or does not meet the standard, the sensors will trigger a vibration and the video will stop until that the move is performed correctly,” Lu said.

“The system can collect all the data and information for therapists to perform assessment and upgrade based on the patient’s development.”

He pointed out that a patient can receive positive results after three months of regular rehabilitation. “For patients who have undergone orthopedic surgery, three months of skilled rehabilitation can help restore primary mobility. With smart medicine, rehabilitation is no longer a cumbersome and boring task, and can be done at any time at the home.”

Smart medicine makes rehabilitation and surgery easier and more efficient

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

A doctor from the Shanghai United Family Hospital explains the condition of the bones to a patient.

In addition to rehabilitation, orthopedists said that smart medicine also helps to achieve individualized treatment.

“Smart medicine is able to make a patient’s bones, muscles and joints visible through 3D modeling before surgery. We can have a mirror image of the patient and discuss and try all the plans on the mirror model to help choose the most appropriate surgical format and implants,” according to Dr. Tan Jun of Shanghai United Family Hospital.

“It’s a real reform of medical practice. The 3D surgical guide plate makes surgery much easier and more precise. Doctors only have to put the plate in the surgical position and make the right cut or hole in line with the plate.”

“During surgery, AR and VR navigation technology is able to guide surgeons to perform the operation more accurately and reduce the risk of error. After surgery, smart medicine allows doctors to review the whole process,” he added.

In Tan’s clinic, the computer system shows the bones and muscles of a 64-year-old woman with poliomyelitis. The computer shows the deformed leg bones and muscles comparing them to that of the healthy leg.

“Thanks to smart technology, we are able to see every bone and muscle of the patient. This not only makes surgery much easier, but also improves communication between doctors and patients, who can have a clear view of the surgery plan,” Tan noted.

Smart medicine makes rehabilitation and surgery easier and more efficient

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

A man follows the health application to do rehabilitation.

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Dr Charlie Teo’s miracle patient Monica Lopresti writes exclusively for Daily Mail Australia https://rhinoplastydigest.com/dr-charlie-teos-miracle-patient-monica-lopresti-writes-exclusively-for-daily-mail-australia/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 23:33:45 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/dr-charlie-teos-miracle-patient-monica-lopresti-writes-exclusively-for-daily-mail-australia/ The idea of ​​Dr. Charlie Teo being cold or calculating, or reckless, or waiting for money before agreeing to have surgery is as puzzling as it is shocking to me. This is nothing like the person I knew through one of the scariest times of my life. I was 23 and thought I was the […]]]>

The idea of ​​Dr. Charlie Teo being cold or calculating, or reckless, or waiting for money before agreeing to have surgery is as puzzling as it is shocking to me.

This is nothing like the person I knew through one of the scariest times of my life.

I was 23 and thought I was the perfect picture of health.

I had a great social life, worked full time, and walked 10,000 steps a day.

Monica Lopresti flew to Spain to have a benign cystic tumor removed from the center of her brain by Dr Charlie Teo (pictured Monica Lopresti, center, with Dr Teo)

Monica was nervously crying before the operation and found Dr Teo so empathetic that she now regards him as

Monica was nervously crying before the operation and found Dr Teo so empathetic that she now considers him ‘like family’

Everything changed in July 2021. I became someone no one recognized – bedridden, pale, withdrawn. I had memory lapses.

The ordeal and recovery of Monica Lopresti

A Sydney woman, Monica Lopresti, was bedridden, pale, having blackouts and losing her memory after turning 24.

He was diagnosed with a benign cystic brain tumor which, due to its location, was likely to lead to brain damage or death.

But her family was told the tumor was inoperable in Australia.

The family contacted Dr Charlie Teo who agreed to operate – but in Spain as he is not allowed to work here.

He managed to remove Monica’s tumor at the end of July, Ms. Lopresti is healthy and back to work full time.

An MRI revealed a benign cystic tumor in the middle of my brain.

While the tumor was benign, its location blocked the normal circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF).

We were devastated when we were told that the pressure caused by too much CSF prevents the brain from functioning properly and can lead to brain damage and death.

By the time the neurosurgeons my mother contacted – seven of them – told me they couldn’t operate, I was already losing my sight.

My father had died of brain cancer eight years earlier. I was extremely scared.

So who is Charlie Teo really? I can only describe it from my own experiences and stick to those.

Let’s get rid of those horrible money stories first.

I heard that Dr. Teo is asking for $50,000 before an operation. This never happened in our situation.

He never even mentioned money in any consultation.

Of course, nothing in life is free, but this idea that Dr. Teo gets some of the money is just plain wrong.

They can’t take someone to hospitals until they make the payment, so we made the payment before the operation.

We don’t want to talk about the specifics of what it cost our family except to say it was worth it.

Monica was told that a tumor blocking the flow of cerebral fluid in her brain (the scan on the right) could cause brain damage or kill her.  By the time seven neurosurgeons told her nothing could be done, she was already losing her sight

Monica was told that a tumor blocking the flow of cerebral fluid in her brain (the scan on the right) could cause brain damage or kill her. By the time seven neurosurgeons told her nothing could be done, she was already losing her sight

Mrs Lopresti argues that Charlie Teo is not

Ms Lopresti argues Charlie Teo is not ‘money hungry’ and never mentioned payment during consultations. The funds his family raised for his operation mostly went to the private hospital where he operates in Madrid

People pay thousands of dollars for cosmetic surgery and cars and no one questions that.

When a patient spends thousands of dollars on life-saving surgery, how can you price it?

But the money was not important to Dr. Teo, what was important to him was that we knew the risks of the surgery.

People pay thousands of dollars for cosmetic surgery and cars and no one questions that, says Ms Lopresti (pictured, Monica and Christina Lopresti)

People pay thousands of dollars for cosmetic surgery and cars and no one questions that, says Ms Lopresti (pictured, Monica and Christina Lopresti)

Within four days of Dr Teo's brain surgery in Spain, she was well enough to explore Madrid (pictured)

Within four days of Dr Teo’s brain surgery in Spain, she was well enough to explore Madrid (pictured)

When you’re going through a storm in life, you want to meet someone who can guide you, give you clear and honest information. It’s even better if they’re nice.

Monica Lopresti said Dr Teo was a much better listener than most medical experts she met

Monica Lopresti said Dr Teo was a much better listener than most medical experts she met

It’s Dr. Teo that my family knows.

But that’s not the only thing that makes him special for us, he also has a great personality.

He was humble, down to earth, empathetic and gentle – a man who listened far more than most doctors I have met.

For the 10 months leading up to my operation, I was in medical centers week after week trying to get answers about my debilitating symptoms – but I was treated like a number, not a person.

People would listen to me for about a minute before either dismissing what I had to say or coming up with an answer. It was like nobody cared.

But when I met Dr. Teo, I walked into his room and felt like I was heard for the first time. He had a lot of knowledge, he recognized all my symptoms, he made me feel human.

When we were in Madrid before the operation, we had a very bad night. We had lost my father to brain cancer eight years ago and his wish was to stop treatment. The emotions were so strong.

Dr. Teo had made it clear to us that he was only a phone call away. My mom, Christina, texted him at 2 a.m. and within 15 minutes he was in front of me.

I sat there and cried and he just listened to me vent. I treated him like a therapist. And he listened to everything. That’s when he became like family to us.

He was also candid about the risks. He’s not a man who trades in false hopes as I’ve heard.

On the day of the operation, he was there before, during and after and it was an incredible comfort.

We had a preoperative appointment during which we reviewed everything and met some of his team.

Dr. Charlie Teo: A Timeline

1957: born in Sydney on December 24

1981: Graduated from UNSW with a BS in Medicine and a BS in Surgery

1982: started in pediatric surgery, then in neurosurgery, then in pediatric neurosurgery in Sydney

1989-1999: Became Australia’s only American Medical Board-certified neurosurgeon, refining a minimally invasive keyhole surgical technique while there

2000: begins to focus on so-called inoperable tumors, which creates friction with peers

2001: Creation of the Cure Brain Cancer Foundation in 2001

2004: Creation of the Center for Minimally Invasive Neurosurgery

2008: Complaint “I would not send my dog ​​to a public hospital”

2011: Appointed Member of the Order of Australia

2012: Delivered the 2012 Australia Day speech

2012-14: Named Most Trusted Australian

2013: Addressed the US Congress on the need for funding for brain surgery

2017: Switched only to operate privately

2019: Criticized for high fees and behavior in a media article, and patients needing to raise funds publicly by Professor Henry Woo

2020: engaged to former patient and international model, Traci Griffiths

2021: NSW Medical Council bars him from performing types of brain surgery in Australia without independent approval, placed under investigation by the Healthcare Complaints Commission

2022: Beginning of surgical operations in South Africa and Spain

After the operation, he waited in my room while I recovered and surprised my mother. He kissed her and told her how amazing I was.

How often does this happen?

My surgery was done on time and I was told that when I wake up my vision will be a little weird, which is normal after brain surgery.

When I woke up the majority of my symptoms were gone and within four days I was out of the hospital and exploring Madrid.

I was lucky – but it’s important to note that it’s not just me who thinks highly of Dr Teo.

The most common thing you hear from his patients is about his kind and caring nature.

Look at the pictures of him with patients. In each photo, he has his arm around them, he is smiling.

This feeling that he is cold or selfish, I don’t understand where it comes from.

To me, it seems crazy to say someone is cold when you haven’t met them.

Today, I am in good health but still recovering. I work full time in insurance as a loss adjuster in Sydney.

My weekends are like coffees and walks with friends, or movie nights and like everyone else, I spend my days at the beach and love swimming in Bondi.

I live a fairly normal life and have to thank Dr Teo for that, I’m sure he was born to save lives.

I am eternally grateful to him and because of that I will always be in his corner.

If I fear for the future, it is the fear that a person will be diagnosed with a high-risk tumor and die because of this risk.

Won’t future surgeons innovate because they are afraid of being shunned by their peers?

It is difficult to understand why patients are denied the right to choose their surgeon.

If it was for your life or that of your child, what would you do?

This is the choice that many families have faced and most of them have not regretted choosing Dr. Teo.

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Do all breast cancer patients need surgery? Maybe not. https://rhinoplastydigest.com/do-all-breast-cancer-patients-need-surgery-maybe-not/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 14:47:27 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/do-all-breast-cancer-patients-need-surgery-maybe-not/ While conventional breast cancer treatments typically involve the deployment of “every tool modern medicine has to offer,” including surgery, a new study published Tuesday in The Lancet Oncology suggests that chemotherapy alone may be sufficient for some patients, writes Roni Caryn Rabin for the New York Times. Study details and key findings For the study, […]]]>

While conventional breast cancer treatments typically involve the deployment of “every tool modern medicine has to offer,” including surgery, a new study published Tuesday in The Lancet Oncology suggests that chemotherapy alone may be sufficient for some patients, writes Roni Caryn Rabin for the New York Times.

Study details and key findings

For the study, researchers followed 50 patients in an early-stage clinical trial that evaluated the effectiveness of neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST) for triple-negative breast cancer and patients with HER2 positive breast cancer.

To be eligible for the trial, patients had to be at least 40 years of age with a diagnosis of single-center cT1-2N0-1M0 triple-negative breast cancer or HER2-positive breast cancer and a residual breast lesion less than two centimeters.

From March 6, 2017 to November 9, 2021, 50 patients participated in the trial. The average age of trial participants was 62 years old. Forty-two percent of patients had triple-negative breast cancer and 58% had HER2-positive breast cancer. Each patient underwent a vacuum-assisted core biopsy (VACB) after receiving an NST to assess their response to treatment.

Over an average follow-up period of 26 months, 31 patients, or about 60 percent, had a positive response and were able to avoid surgery, the researchers said.

Comment

According to Henry Kuerer, professor of surgical breast oncology at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and the study’s principal investigator, avoiding surgery for invasive breast cancer is “the ultimate form of breast-conserving therapy.”

“Breast surgery can lead to complications such as infections, and even breast-conserving procedures like lumpectomy can change the shape of the breast, leave scars or indentations, a tight feeling, or lasting nerve pain,” Rabin writes. .

Kuerer noted that some patients prefer radical surgery even if it doesn’t increase their survival rate. However, others find minor surgery “emotionally draining” even if the procedure is successful, Rabin writes.

“Breast cancer is so common, and there will always be people who would rather not have surgery,” Kuerer added.

For example, trial patient Pamela Romero, who was eligible to forgo surgery, wanted to avoid the procedure after doctors discovered a HER2-positive tumor about the size of a grape.

“The doctor asked, ‘How do you feel about the surgery? and I said, ‘I’m very scared of it,'” Romero said. “I said, ‘If I can get rid of the cancer without surgery, I’m all for it.'”

“I didn’t want to be submissive or go under the knife,” added Romero, who had never had surgery.

Romero’s tumor shrank by around 85% after undergoing four infusions of chemotherapy, which allowed him to forego surgery. Two treatments later, her regimen was full. She recently celebrated her third anniversary of completing treatment and is still healthy today.

The work is part of a de-escalation approach to cancer therapy, individualizing treatment to achieve the same results with fewer treatments and fewer interventions, Rabin writes.

“What I really like about the study is that it takes the next step and asks a bold question: how do we take all the advances we’ve made in more tailored and more specific cancer therapy, and convert them into a reduction in the number and types of procedures a patient has to undergo?” said Karen Knudsen, CEO of American Cancer Society.

“Asking if we can reduce surgery is a reasonable next consideration for the future of cancer care,” she added.

While the study followed patients for a significant period of time, experts noted that a larger trial with a comparison group would be needed to determine whether changes in medical practice are warranted, Rabin writes.

“The big picture is that this is a small study,” said Monica Morrow, chief of breast surgery at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “It’s by no means definitive. It won’t change the practice in any way.”

Separately, Kuerer said that while the trial results are promising, most breast cancer patients will still need surgery. “It’s important for patients to know that this is the very beginning of a new type of treatment for some patients,” he said. (Rabin, New York Times, 10/25; Kurer et al., The Lancet Oncology10/25)

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Tigers modify medical and conditioning staff https://rhinoplastydigest.com/tigers-modify-medical-and-conditioning-staff/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 22:18:06 +0000 https://rhinoplastydigest.com/tigers-modify-medical-and-conditioning-staff/ DETROIT — The Tigers are shaking up their medical and conditioning staff after an injury-plagued 2022 season that included a team-record 17 starting pitchers and a slew of traffic on the injured list. Among the changes, according to the sources: • Kevin Rand, the team’s senior director of medical services for the past five seasons […]]]>

DETROIT — The Tigers are shaking up their medical and conditioning staff after an injury-plagued 2022 season that included a team-record 17 starting pitchers and a slew of traffic on the injured list. Among the changes, according to the sources:

• Kevin Rand, the team’s senior director of medical services for the past five seasons and a member of the Tigers’ medical staff for the past 20 years, will not be returning. He is on an expiring contract which will not be renewed.

• Doug Teter, who took over from Rand as head athletic trainer ahead of the 2018 season and has been with the Tigers organization for 30 years, will move to a role to be determined in Lakeland, Fla., where the Tigers have their spring training and rehab facilities and where Teter made his home during the offseason. It won’t necessarily be the same role Rand has held, depending on how Detroit reshapes the department.

• Steve Chase, whose 18 years with the organization includes the last two seasons as Major League Strength and Conditioning Coordinator, will not be returning.

The moves were expected as part of the organizational assessment that New President of Baseball Operations Scott Harris done since joining the organization in September. Harris’ predecessor, general manager Al Avila, was fired in August amid a disappointing season, helped in large part by injuries to key pitchers and prospects. Former top prospect Casey Mize underwent Tommy John surgery over the summer and is not expected to return until the end of next season at the earliest. Tarik Skubal will miss part of next season after undergoing left flexor tendon surgery. Matt Manning missed much of the season with shoulder inflammation and later a forearm sprain, neither of which required surgery to repair. Alex Fedo returned from Tommy John surgery but was limited to 12 starts before a season-ending hip injury. Joey Wentz missed a good part of the season with a shoulder problem.

The trio of Mize, Skubal and Manning — arguably the heart of the Tigers’ rebuild — have made just 35 combined starts this season. Skubal’s 21 starts and 117 2/3 innings led the staff.

It would be unfair to blame the injury on the Tigers’ medical and fitness staff. Athletic coaches, like other team officials, were barred from contacting players for much of the past offseason until Major League Baseball and the Players’ Association agreed to a new collective bargaining agreement in March meant that many players were out of reach for much of their offseason. training programs and could not report progress or problems. reliever Kyle Funkhouser, who had a problem during his winter training, missed the entire season and underwent shoulder surgery. Add to that shortened spring training, and many around baseball wondered how pitchers in particular would handle the buildup.

Still, the eruption of problems led to looking at the Tigers’ medical system as a whole and determining how it might be equipped to handle the issues.

“I don’t think the injuries can be associated with the strengths and weaknesses of our medical department or our bodybuilding department,” manager AJ Hinch said earlier this month. “It’s been a really tough year, and these guys have been working tirelessly. They were dealing with something every day of the season. We’re going to look at our processes and see where we can improve and what we’re doing well and what we’re doing. are doing below average and trying to fix it all.

In saying this, however, Hinch alluded to a need for synergy between Detroit and Lakeland, where most of the rehab processes take place.

“You saw us sending people to Lakeland all the time. Lakeland has become overwhelmed with humans,” Hinch said, “and quite honestly I think that’s revealed that we can probably improve that department, and I think that’s something the organization needs to look at, at the both in size and strength of our overall program. But it must be completely tied together. The way we run our medical program must be one-sided across the organization.

No move has been finalized in the rest of the department. Assistant athletic coaches and Chris McDonald and Matt Rankin remain on staff and look likely to stay. They have been on Detroit’s staff for three and nine years, respectively, and have been with the organization for more than 20 years each. Assistant strength and conditioning coordinator Matt Rosenhamer has been on staff for three years.

Tigers, Chadd mutually agree to part ways

Beyond the medical and health team, the Tigers continue to shake up the front office. Assistant general manager David Chadd, who has been with the organization since 2004, and the Tigers have mutually agreed to part ways, sources say.

The two sides had discussed a potential new role in the organization, possibly in scouting, before agreeing to move on. Chadd still had two years left on his contract.

Chadd joined the Tigers in 2004 as vice president of amateur scouting and remained in that role for 11 years. Under his leadership, the Tigers drafted Cam Maybin, Andrew Miller, Rick Porcello, Matt Joyce, Alex Avila, Nick Castellanos, Drew Smyly, James McCann, Curt Casali, Devon Travis, Chad Green and Corey Knebel, among others.

Chadd was promoted to become Al Avila’s top assistant once Avila became general manager in 2015. Chadd played an important role in that position before focusing on minor leagues and player development the year last, following the promotion of Sam Menzin and Jay Sartori. as deputy general manager.

Chadd is the second high-ranking member of the Tigers front office to leave this month. The club separated from director of amateur scouting Scott Pleis shortly after the end of the season, according to sources.

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